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N 




elchanite 



Lompliments 

of 

1 esniva University 

High Schools 
Brooklyn 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/elchanitebrookly1955unse 






TALMIJDICAI ACADEMY 



brooklyn 26, nevt^ york 



JUNE 1955 



flchanite 





CONTENTS 

DEDICATION 3 

SCHOOL 4 

ADMINISTRATION 5 

ELCHANITE STAFF 6 

FACULTY 10 

SENIOR ANNALS 15 

Graduates 16 

Diary 32 

Honors 36 

ACTIVITIES 37 

G.0 38 

Student Court 41 

Service Squad 42 

Arista 44 

\Elchanite Squad 46 

Kolenu 47 

Topics 48 

Debating 50 

Variety Nite 52 

Library . 54 

Varsity Basketball 56 

J.V. Basketball 59 

Intra-Mural 60 

Co-op Store 61 

All in a Day 62 

LITERATURE 65 

T. A. in Retrospect — By Rabbi Abraham N. Zuroff .... 66 

Dual Allegiance? — By Eli Lazar 69 

Oscar Straus: Jew and Diplomat — By Abraham Witty . . .71 

Tercentenary Gift to A merica 74 

Judaic Influence on A merican Democracy 

— By Hyam Wasserman 76 

Advancement of Judaic Studies in America — By Jack Klein . . 78 

ADVERTISEMENTS 81 

SENIOR DIRECTORY 127 




Dedication 



AS MEMBERS of the 1955 graduating class, we 
*» take special cognizance of the fact that the 
culmination of our four years at Talmudical Acad- 
emy coincides with the celebration of the Three 
Hundredth Anniversary of Jewish Life in America. 
All American Jews have reason to rejoice in 
their rich and colorful past, but we, as students of 
a branch of Yeshiva University should feel our- 
selves an integral part of the celebration. It has 
been Yeshiva University that has pioneered in tra- 
ditional Jewish education and has been a dynamic 
force on the American Jewish scene. Yeshiva has 
typified the synthesis of Americanism and Judaism 
and has been fulfilling its responsibility in pro- 
ducing the future leaders of American Jewry. 

In this Tercentenary year, we therefore dedicate 
our Elchanite to the theme of the Anniversary — 
"Man's Opportunities and Responsibilities Under 
Freedom" — ever mindful of the fact that an evalu- 
ation of past achievement should only serve as a 
guide and an inspiration to the future. 



MAN'S OPPORlpNITIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER FREEDOM'' 






Dr. Samuel Belkin, 
President, Yeshiva University 



admmstration 




Dr. Shelley R. Saphire, Principal 





Rabbi Abraham N. Zuroff, Administrator Mr. Samuel Levine, Director 




Eli Lazar, Editor-in-Chief 





^ 



Arthur Eidelman, Co-Editor 




David Levine, Editor-in-Chief 



el 




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Jerome Blau, Co-Editor 




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Norman Bloom, Activities 




S T A F 




chanite 




Arthur Cantor, A ctivities 





Robert Hirt, A ctivities 
Irving Welfeld, Activities 



A 






Hyam Zuckerberg, Activities 





Alan Dershowitz, Business 



Herman Bursky, Business 



Elias Herschmann, Business Norman Kupietsky, Business 





Martin Schiffenbauer, Art 








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Sheldon Wilon, Art Sidney Goldstein, Photography 




Barnett Yukolis, Photography 





Jacob Nusbacher, A rt 



vrp- 




Mr. Ben Brender, 
French and Spanish 



10 




Dr. Jechiel Lichtenstein, 
French and Hebrew 



11 




12 




Mr. Morris P. Turetsky, 

Mathematics 



Mr. Israel Wallach, 
'Mathematics 



» » ■ -« » 1 < . » * m ■ « ^ 



13 




I^ENIOR AXNALS 



15 




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1 



DAVID ABERBACH 

"Elchanite" Associate Activities Editor 7, 8; Class 
Vice-President 6; Class Athletic Manager 7. 
Abby, our class archeologist, spent his time digging 
up old Regents with which to puzzle Mr. Wallach. 
Among his other findings are unknown facts about 
unheard of ballplayers and vice-presidents. David will 
continue his excavations at Yeshiva College. 
"Facts and figures! Put 'em down!" 

Dickens 



ALLAN BACHMAN 

"Elchanite" Art Squad 5-7; Junior Varsity Basketball 
5, 6. 

As one of the "Three Horsemen" of Rabbi Gordon's 
class, Al achieved fame as the champion hand wrestler 
of the school. Graduating with herculean effort, he 
will continue his studies at Brooklyn College. 
"His lines were cast in manly mould. 
For hardy sports or contest bold." 

Scott 





ALEXANDER BIENENSTOCK 

Class Debating Manager 7; "Elchanite" Art Squad 5; 
Class Sanitation Manager 4; Service Squad 5. 
"Beans" cycled his way through T.A. with only an 
occasional puttering stuttering in Rabbi Faivelson's 
class. Gaining momentum in his last year, Alex will 
follow in his brother's footsteps with a pre-med 
course at N.Y.U. 
"I was determined to know beans." 

Thoreau 





JEROME BLAU 

Arista Leader 7; Arista ti/lember 5-8; "Elctianite" Co- 
Editor 7, 8; Student Court 7; "Inter-T.A. Banner" 
Editor 6-8; Sctiool Debating Team 5, 6; "Topics" Busi- 
less Manager 5; Class Vice-President 1; Class Debat- 
ng Manager 6; Junior Varsity Basketball 3-6. 
lerry, our "student of ttie year," excelled in both his 
lecular and talmudic studies. Top masmid and mathe- 
naticlan, this ardent Zionist was chief quibbler with 
Mr. Lilker. He will continue at Y.U. 
'Alone at nights. I read my Bible more and Euclid 
less." 

Buchanan 



NORMAN BLOOM 

Arista Vice-Leader 8; Arista Secretary 7; Arista Member 
5-8; "Elchanite" Activities Editor 7. 8; Student Court 
7; Class Vice-President 5; Class Debating Manager 4; 
Class Sanitation Manager 2; "Topics" Copy Editor 6-8; 
School Debating Team Research Committee 6; Class 
Debating Team 3-6; "Topics" Reporter 5; Audio-Visual 
Committee 7, 8; G.O. Public Relations Staff 7. 
"Perach," the flower of the French world, starred in 
the well-known "Kenny Mutiny." Serving as the "bad 
spirit" in Dr. Lichtenstein's class, Normie will attend 
Y.U. where he hopes to bloom into an M.D. 
"The skill of the physician shall lift up his head; 
and in the sight of great men shall be in admiration." 
King Solomon 



HERMAN BURSKY 

School Athletic Manager 8; "Elchanite" Business Man- 
ager 7, 8; Class Vice-President 7; Class Athletic Man- 
ager 2, 4, 6; Class Debating Team 2, 7; Varsity Basket- 
ball 5-8; Junior Varsity Basketball 1-4; School Chess 
and Checker Team 4; Library Squad 5, 6; Service Squad 
3-6. 

Harm, speed demon of our Varsity, was one of the 
businessmen of the "Elchanite." As Athletic Manager, 
he defended the team against all of Mr. Lilker's com- 
ments. Having to Alter his course in going to T.A., 
Herm will Flo through college where he will study law. 
"As solid as the Rock of Gibr-Alter." 

Bloom 



17 






ARTHUR CANTOR 

G.O. Secretary-Treasurer 7; Arista 5-8; Student Court 
5-8; ■■Elchanite" Activities Editor 7, 8; Class Debating 
Manager 5i School Debating Team 5, 6; Variety Night 
Music Director 5-8; ■Topics" Business Staff 5, 6; 
"Topics" Reporter 2. 4, 5. 7; "Topics" Typist 2-6; 
Class Debating Team 1-8. 

Artie, tallest and best dressed in the class, has a list 
of accomplishments as long as his frame. Noted for 
his affinity to music and for his rhetoric, he will talk 
his way through a college pre-law course. 
"If music be the food of love, play on; 
Give me excess of it." 

Shakespeare 



FRANKLIN DANZIGER 

Class Debating Manager 8; Hebrew Library Squad 3, 

4, 7; Co-op Store Salesman 5. 

Frank returned to T.A. in his Senior year to organize 

the largest mail order house this side of the Gowanus, 

Captain of our rifle team, he will continue his business 

at one of the city colleges. 

"Money is honey, my little sonny." 

Brown 



ALLAN DERSHOWITZ 

School Debating Manager 5, 6; School Debating Team 
2-8; Class President 6; Class Vice-President 4, 5; Class 
Debating Manager 2, 3; Class Debating Team 1-8; 
Inter-Yeshiva Student Council President 7, 8; "Elcha- 
nite" Business Manager 7, 8; Junior Varsity Basketball 
3, 4; Varsity Basketball 5-8; Service Squad 6. 
Avi, the Henry Clay of T.A.. orated to top honors in the 
Journal-American Oratorical Contest. He will be re- 
membered for his promotion of inter-school activities 
and for his court reforms. He will continue at Brooklyn 
College in pursuit of a law career. 
"Charm us orator, till the lion looks no larger than a 



cat.' 



Tennyson 



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ARTHUR EIDELMAN 

Arista 5-8; Student Court 7; "Elchanite" Co-Editor 7, 
8i School Athletic Manager 5; "Topics" Sports Editor 
5, 6; Class President 5; Class Vice-President 4; Class 
Secretary-Treasurer 1; Class Athletic Manager 3; 
"Topics" Reporter 4; Class Debating Team 1, 5; Junior 
Varsity Basketball 3, 4; Varsity Basketball 5-8; Service 
Squad 3. 4. 

One of T.A.'s devoted Massadites, Artie made the round 
of rebbies and was on his second lap when stopped by 
graduation. An outstanding promoter of B.T.A. athletics 
and an admirer of wealthy femininity and fine music, 
our opera lover will breeze through a college course 
in dentistry and aesthetics. 
"Music is another planet." 

Daudet 





YEHUDI FELMAN 

Arista 7, 8; Student Court 8; Class President 8; Class 
Vice-President 6; Class Secretary-Treasurer 4; Class 
Debating Team 6-8; School Debating Team 7; "Topics" 
Business Manager 7, 8; "Topics" Circulation Manager 
6; "Inter-T.A. Banner" Reporter 6-8; Co-op Store Sales- 
man 6; Service Squad 7; "Topics Bulletin" Editor 8. 
As Mr Kallner's major source of "nachas" in the 
Biology class, Yehudi forged his way to fame by know- 
ing every phylum from Protozoa to Chordata. Through 
perseverance and ingenuity he boosted the "Topics" 
circulation to over one thousand. The rabbinate will 
be his goal at Yeshiva University. 
"Like father, like son." 

French Proverb 



JOSEPH GEFFEN 

Co-op Store Salesman 7; Service Squad 8; Class Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 8; Library Squad 8. 
En route to one of the nation's foremost Ivy League 
schools. Joe managed to stop off at B.T.A. for a year's 
visit. As Mr. Gold's foremost disciple, our envoy from 
South America immediately established himself as a 
literary scholar. He will prepare for a career in medi- 
cine. 
"Better late than never." 

Heywood 



19 




HAROLD CLATTER 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 7, 8; "Topics" Business Staff 

7, 8; Service Squad 5-7. 

East New Yorl('s gift to Kensington, Harold came to us 

as the Special Ambassador of the Royal Chassidic 

Society. Noted for his positions as chief "butler" 

to Rabbi Yogel and chaperone to Mr. Morse, Harold 

will continue his activities at Y.U. 

"Clatter, like a batter, is always on the ball." 

Yukolovitch 



LEONARD GOLDSMITH 

Class Debating Team 2, 3; "Elchanite" Associate Pho- 
tography Editor 7, 8; "Elchanite" Photography Squad 
6; "Elchanite" Art Squad 5, 6; Audio-Visual Committee 
3-5; Service Squad 3-5. 

Lord Protector of T.A.'s projector, Lenny illuminated 
every sector with his Physics knowledge. One of the 
school's best photographers (just ask him and he'll 
tell you), he hopes to snap through a Physics course 
at Y.U. 

"If a man's wit be wandering, let him study the 
sciences." 

Mostly from Bacon 



20 





SIDNEY GOLDSTEIN 

Arista 8; "Elchanite" Photography Editor?, 8; "Topics" 
Circulation Staff 5; Co-op Sales Manager 6; Co-op 
Store Salesman 5; Office Squad 5; Service Squad 4, 7. 
Sidney's politeness and reserved mannerism earned 
for him the respect of his fellow classmates. An enter- 
prising photographer, our "Elchanite" Photo Editor 
also managed to display his fine salesmanship in our 
flourishing Co-op Store. He will continue his studies 
at Yeshiva University. 
"Silence is deep as Eternity, 
Speech is shallow as Time." 

Carlyle 




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NORMAN GORLYN 

Class Debating Team 4, 5, 7, 8; Charity Collector 7, 
8; Serv.ce Squad 7, 8. 

Normie, president of T.A.'s branch of the National 
Association of Manufacturers, served as the butt of 
many of Mr. Lilker's remarks. Hoping to become a 
button tycoon and a leading defendant in government 
suits against monopolies, he will pursue "Liberal" 
Arts at N.Y.U. 
"Each button you will use, 
Will pay for Normie's Republican dues." 

Levinsky 



JACOB GREENFIELD 

Class President 7, 8; Class Vice-President 1; Office 
Squad 4-8; School Charity Collector 8; Junior Varsity 
Basketball 3-6; Class Sanitation Manager 2-4; Service 
Squad 4-7. 

Jake, president of Boro Park's infamous Shields, car- 
ried his politics to T.A. where he served as Senior 
Class President. A firm believer in PARLIAMENTary 
procedure, he puffed his way through many a long 
G.O. meeting. Our Charity Collector will continue his 
"schnorring" at Brooklyn College. 
"Charity begins at B.T.A." 

Greenfield 



IRWIN GREENSPAN 

Arista 7, 8; Service Squad Captain 8: Service Squad 
Lieutenant 7; School Debating Team 7; Class Vice- 
President 8; Class Debating Team 2-6; School Band 
1-3; Co-op Store Salesman 4, 5; "Topics" Reporter 5; 
"Topics" Typist 5; Service Squad 6. 
Irwin, one of the most serious minded and persevering 
students in the class, managed to find time to enter- 
tain us on his saxophone. Topping off his T.A. career 
with an admirable job as Service Squad Captain, he 
will resume his position in the famous Greenspan 
Brothers musical duo (of Variety Night fame) at Co- 
lumbia University. 
"Behold he is the toiling man." 

Markham 



21 





TSVI GRONER 

School Debating Team 5; Class Debating Manager 4, 
5; Class Debating Team 3-8; Zionist Club President 6; 
"Kolenu" Staff 6; Library Squad 5, 6; •■Elchanite" 
Associate Business Manager 7, 8. 
Tsvi came to T.A. from R.J. J. and quickly established 
himself as one of Rabbi Kanotopsky's top masmidim. 
An outstanding debater, he was as familiar with a 
debater's manual as v;ith a Rambam. As T.A.'s most 
ardent Zionist, Tsvi plans to make his home in Israel 
in the near future. 

"My heart is in the East, and I in the uttermost West." 
Yehuda Halevi 



PHILIP HALBFINGER 

"Topics" Reporter 1; Junior Varsity Basketball 5, 6; 
Junior Varsity Manager 3, 5; "Elchanite" Typist 7, 8; 
Charity Collector 3; Class Sanitation Manager 2; Serv- 
ice Squad 6-8. 

Phil, the Co-op Store's major supplier, traveled through 
T.A.. an ardent fan and critic of our basketball team. 
This happy fellow also managed to serve as public 
relations manager for one of our former stars. He 
will combine his pleasant disposition with his integrity 
in pursuit of a career as a toy tycoon, 
"It is a happy lot which finds no enemies." 

Syrus 




( i% 



ELIAS HERSCHMANN 

G.O. President 8; G.O. Vice-President 7; Arista 7, 8; 
"Topics" Editor-in-Chief 5. 6; Student Court 7, 8; 
"Elchanite" Business Manager 7, 8; School Debating 
Team 5, 7; Class Debating Manager 1, 5; "Topics" 
Staff 2-4; Class Vice-President 2; Co-op Public Rela- 
tions Manager 5; Class Debating Team 1-8. 
Founder of our printed newspaper, Elias made the 
"Topics" both interesting and appealing. Deciding that 
the old building was too far away from Central, he 
induced the administration to move to its present 
quarters. Our G.O. President will prepare for a medical 
career at Yeshiva University. 
"I fear three newspapers more than a hundred 
bayonets." 

Napoleon I 





MARVIN HIRSCHHORN 

Class President 5; Class Athletic Manager 3, 4; Class 
Debating Team 3-5; "Topics" Reporter 5-8; Varsity 
Basketball Captain 3-8; Service Squad 5, 6. 
Honorable mention on All-City Prep team, high scorer 
of the Varsity, Jewish High School All Star for two 
successive seasons ... are just a few of the reasons 
why Whitey was voted T.A.'s "most popular" basket- 
ball player. Marvin can now be unmasked as the writer 
of "Chick 'n' Chuck." He will study business at CCNY. 
"Dribble, dribble, toil and quibble." 

Pilfered from Shakespeare 










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ROBERT HIRT 

School Athletic Manager 5; "Elchanite" Activities 
Editor 7, 8; Class President 2, 3; Class Vice-President 
1; Class Debating Team 1-6; Variety Night Leader 7. 8; 
Junior Varsity Basketball 2-4; Varsity Basketball 5-8; 
School Band 1. 2. 

The Stan Kenton of T.A., Bob made a name for himself 
by staging the only Variety Night to feature a three- 
man instrumental quartet. This star bowler was also 
a great asset to our Varsity basketeers, being high 
scorer in one of the most crucial games of the season. 
He will study for the rabbinate at RIETS. 
School was one big symphony to him. 



JACK KLEIN 

Arista 6-8; G.O. Vice-President 8; Service Squad Cap- 
tain 7; Class President 6; Class Debating Team 7. 8: 
"Elchanite" Typing Editor 7, 8; "Topics" Typist 7; 
Service Squad 5-8; G.O. Publications Staff 8: Class 
Sanitation Manager 5. 

Jack, one of Rabbi Yogel's star pup'ls, disproved the 
theory that extra-curricular participation and scholar- 
ship don't mix. Having made four talmud classes in 
two years, our Veep will continue at Yeshiva University. 
Jack be nimble. Jack be quick. 
Jack helped make the G.O. tick. 



23 





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NORMAN KUPIETSKY 

Arista 8; "Elchanite" Business Manager 7. 8; Class 
Debating Manager 6; Class Debating Team 5-7; Class 
Athletic Manager 1, 3; "Elchanite" Art Squad 7; 
"Topics" Business Staff 5; "Topics' Circulation Staff 
6; Co-op Store Salesman 5. 6; Library Squad 5, 6; 
Service Squad 5-7. 

Nach came to T.A. a professional caterer and left, a 
camp executive. "Little Jonah," our industrious Busi- 
ness Manager will attain a B.B.A. (Business Adminis- 
tration Degree) while continuing his talmudic studies 
at T.I. 

"To throw a ball into a hoop, 
Was a favorite pastime of the Koop." 

Lazarovitch 



BERTON LAPIDUS 

Arista 6-8; Class President 1; Student Court 7; Class 
Debating Team 1, 3; Laboratory Assistant 6-8; Office 
Squad 7, 8; Service Squad 6. 

One of Mr. Lebowitz's favorite "clucks," Bert distin- 
guished himself by his excellence in the sciences. A 
connoisseur of cigars and a mathematical genius, he 
intends to prepare for a career in engineering. 
"I perceive by certain evidences thine ability to learn 
sciences." 

Chaucer 





ELI LAZAR 



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"Elchanite" Editor-in-Chief 7, 8; G.O. President 7; 
G.O. Secretary-Treasurer 5, 6; Arista 6-8; "Topics" 
News Editor 5, 6; Student Court 7; "Kolenu" Art Edi- 
tor 5; "Elchanite" Associate Art Editor 4; School De- 
bating Team 6-8; "Elchanite" Art Squad 3-8; "Elcha- 
nite" Writer 4; "Topics" Reporter 2-4; Class President 
4; Class Secretary-Treasurer 3; Class Debating Team 
1. 4. 5, 6. 

T.A.'s answer to Pericles, Eli devoted himself to school 
affairs. A hard worker and a good student, he showed 
the school that being "Elchanite" Editor-in-Chief and 
G.O. President at the same time is not an insurmount- 
able task. In his spare time, he managed to take a 
first place in the Journal-American Tournament of 
Orators. 
"Politics is the art of human happiness." 

Fisher 



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DAVID LEVINE 

"Elchanite" Editor-in-Chief 7, 8; "Kolenu" Art Editor 
5; "Elchanite" Associate Art Editor 3, 4; Class Presi- 
dent 1, 3; "Topics" Feature Editor 5; Co-op Store 
Manager 8; "Topics" Reporter 1-3; "Elchanite" Art 
Squad 2-8; "Elchanite" Writer 3, 4; Service Squad 3. 
David, the learned lad who could rattle off vocabulary 
like a "blatt gemora," was a mixture of liberal Repub- 
licanism and T.A. anarchism. A gifted artist, our 
"Elchanite" Editor-in-Chief will peep into the test 
tubes of Y.U. in pursuit of a medical career. 
"The health of the people is really the foundation on 
which all their happiness and power depends." 
Disraeli 



MARTIN LISTOWSKY 

student 1-8. 

Although Martin attended school only on rare occa- 
sions, he accomplished much in the few minutes he 
was present. His excellent mark on the Advanced Al- 
gebra Regents, after a term's absence, is proof enough 
of this fact. Martin will continue his studies at Brook- 
lyn College. 
"Martin, Martin, wherefore art thou, Martin?" 

Lifted from Shakespeare 



JERRY LLOYD 

School Athletic Manager 7; Class Debating Team 1, 2, 
7, 8; Class Secretary-Treasurer 2; Class Sanitation 
Manager 1; Junior Varsity Basketball 1. 2; Varsity 
Basketball 3-8; Service Squad 8. 
Mild mannered Jerry, led T.A.'s delegation to the 
corner bowling alley. When at school, he could usually 
be found on the basketball court improving his shoot- 
ing skills. This graceful star will continue his absences 
at Brooklyn College. 
"Tobacco may be a filthy weed. 
But it certainly fulfilled Jerry's need." 

Oavidovitz 



25 







ROBERT NEWMAN 

Class President 5, 7; "Elchanite" Art Squad 6-8; 

"Topics" Reporter 3. 

Bob is the "iron man" of the class, never having 

missed a single homev^ork assignment. He is of that 

strange breed viho claims not to know anything before 

a test but, when the marks are in, is strangely at the 

top. A very cooperative fellow, he always gives a 

helping hand to anybody who needs it. 

If he has any faults, he has left us in doubt; 

At least in four years, we could not find them out. 



JACOB NUSBACHER 

Arista 8; Service Squad Captain 8; Class Vice-President 
5, 8; Class Debating Manager 4; Class Debating Team 
1-5; "Elchanite" Art Squad 5-8; "Elchanite" Associate 
Art Editor 7, 8; "Topics" Reporter 1-3; Varsity Basket- 
ball 5-7. 

The only impasse met by Jake at T.A. was his failure 
to sign the College Board declaration. Doing things in 
a good-natured manner, Nussie still managed to be a 
stern and capable Service Squad Captain. Our table 
tennis champ will attend Yeshiva University in the fall. 
Jake replied with a nonchalant air, 
"How could I sign It if it wasn't there?" 

Levine 



JOSEPH PENNER 

Arista 6-8; Class Vice-President 7; Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 4, 6; Service Squad 6, 

As the Herb Shriner of Boro Park, Joe treated us to 
four years of subtle but devastating humor. A late 
sleeper, he deemed his sleep more important than 
a silly Chemistry Regents, Jose will major in mirth 
and somnambulism at Yeshiva University. 
"Blessing on him that first invented sleep." 

Cervantes 









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GERALD PINSKY 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 3; Class Sanitation Managei 
5; Class Debating Team 7, 8; "Topics" Reporter 3 
Office Squad 8; Library Squad 2; Service Squad 5, 6 
Gedaliah became famous by engaging in a correspond 
ence that mac'e every senior two pamphlets richer 
Danziger's greatest competitor in the mall order bus 
ness will continue his education at Brooklyn College 
"In G-d we trust; men pay cash." 

Kallner 





MOSES POLANSKY 

Class President 4; Variety Night Leader 7, 8; Class 
Athletic Manager 1. 8; Class Debating Team 1-8 
"Topics" Reporter 4; Junior Varsity Basketball 3-6; 
Junior Varsity Captain 5, 6; Varsity Basketball 7, 8: 
"Elchanite" Writer 6; Office Squad 8. 
Moe "counted his blessings" in B.T.A. and found 
himself a radio give-away-show winner and a director 
of Variety Night. His personal coaching and pioneering 
spirit brought the J.V. some of its great moments. 
Moishe will prepare for a career at Y.U. 
" 'Count Your Blessings' couldn't stop Moe, 
So he wound up counting his dough." 

Bloom 



ALBERT REINGOLD 

Class Debating Team 7; Library Squad 5. 6; Service 
Squad 5. 6. 

Albert, the pathfinder of the bicycle brigade, blazed 
a trail to T.A.'s new building. Dr. Lichtenstein's avid 
Hebraist will attend Brooklyn College. 
"Neither rain nor slow nor sleet. 
Could keep his bike off the street." 

"Elchanite" '51 



27 




MOSHE REISS 

Class President 5; Class Secretary-Treasurer 6. 7; 
■■Topics" Reporter 3. 4; Varsity Basketball Trainer 7. 
Moishe was one of Mr. Lebowitz's prize students (when 
awake}. A deserter in body, but not In soul, he always 
remained loyal to his former neighbors and to his 
native Williamsburg. This ardent classicist will con- 
tinue his studies at Brooklyn College. 
"Reading maketh a full man." 

Bacon 



MARTIN SCHIFFENBAUER 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 2; "Elchanite" Art Editor 
7. 8; "Elctianite" Art Squad 4-6; Class Debating Team 
4-7; ■■Topics" Business Staff 6; Library Typing Squad 
5; Service Squad 5, 7. 

Known to all as "Ttie Sctiiff," ttiis happy-go-lucky 
fellow spent his time creating ■■one-eyed" drawings, 
and verse equally weird. Mr. Lilker's favorite Eco- 
nomics student, Marty tested theories learned, by 
dabbling in the stock market. T.A.^s J. P. Morgan 
will study accounting at CCNY, while preparing for 
the rabbinate at Yeshiva. 

"The cow and the grass have nothing in common. 
Except that the cow eats grass and grass is very 
common." 

Schiffenbauer 





BERNARD SEGAL 

Class Vice-President 1; Class Secretary-Treasurer 5; 
Class Debating Team 1-5; ■'Topics" Reporter 4; Office 
Squad 6; Service Squad 3. 

Williamsburg's coolest chassid. Berry gained fame by 
his unforeseen absence in the Junior year. He will be 
remembered as the organizer of B.T.A.'s jazz society, 
which held concerts daily near the "good Rabbi's^' 
office. Brooklyn College will be his next hop. 
"Eat, drink, and be Berry. ■■ 

Yukolis 



28 





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STANLEY SIEGELMAN 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 5, 6; Class Debating Team 
8; Office Squad 8; Library Squad 2. 
A charter member of Rabbi Gordon's class, Stan 
whistled his way through T.A. as a devotee of the 
Audubon Society. The copping of the marble shooting 
contest in Mr. Cantor's class stands out as one of 
his greatest achievements. This professional juggler 
will continue at Brooklyn College. 
"And be these juggling fiends no more believ'd." 
Shakespeare 



LEONARD TRUGMAN 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 1; Class Debating Manager 
1, 4; Class Debating Team 7; Class Athletic Manager 
4. 5; Varsity Basketball 5-8, 

Truggie, the Bob Cousy of the "Minute Men," drib- 
bled his way through four years at the Academy. He 
is known as one of the nicest "little men" to have 
around. During the off-season, Lenny displayed his 
mathematical talents in the classes of Messrs. Wallach 
and Mo. 
"Oh to dribble to infinity once again." 

Lazarinsky 



JOSEPH TUCH 

Class Sanitation Manager 5; Varsity Basketball Man- 
ager 7, 8; Office Squad 5; Service Squad 8. 
Through the generosity of Hay's Open Door Policy to 
China (and outer Mongolia) Joe made his way to Dr. 
Lichtenstein's class where he expounded the theory 
of "never a dull moment." This devoted basketball 
manager and inflater of basketballs will continue at 
Brooklyn College. 
"Better a bad excuse than none at all." 



29 




IRVING WELFELD 

Arista 7, 8; Class President 2, 4; "Elchanite" Activi- 
ties Editor 7, 8; "Topics" Sports Editor 7; "Topics" 
Reporter 2-5; Class Athletic Manager 3, 7; Class 
Debating Team 4; Junior Varsity Basketball 3, 4; Var- 
sity Basketball 5-8; Service Squad 7; Varsity Co- Cap- 
tain 7, 8. 

Irv, Williamsburg's gift to contemporary civilization, 
spent his four years at T.A. outwisecracking his teach- 
ers. Knov^n to Varsity members as 'Harry the Horse," 
he captained them to their second Brooklyn Division 
Championship. This future lawyer hopes to receive his 
degree at Columbia University. 
"Whate'er he did was done with so much ease." 
Dryden 



mm 



ALLEN WEISS 

Class Debating Manager 1; Class Debating Team 5; 
Library Squad 5, 6. 

The "red devil" of T.A.. Allen kept Dr. Lichtenstein's 
class in humor. A two-year man in Rabbi Gordon's 
class, he hopes to be a four-year man at City College. 
"Born with a gift of laughter." 

Sabitini 








SHELDON WILON 

"Elchanite" Art Editor 7, 8; Class Secretary-Treasurer 
2; "Elchanite" Art Squad 3-8; Library Squad 1; Class 
Sanitation Manager 1; Service Squad 3-5. 
Although he was the only graduate to have the dis- 
tinction of takmg all available subjects, Shelly still 
managed to get an education. Our Art Editor, known 
for his world-wide travels, will pursue an engineering 
degree at City College. 

"School is all right as long as it doesn't interfere with 
your getting an education." 

Twain 



MALCOLM WOLFE 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 1. 

Malcolm was the major partner in the triumvirate of 
Vi/olfe, Weiss and Siegelman. Although never achieving 
his ambition of forming a school baseball team, his 
efforts were nevertheless appreciated. He will study 
pre-law at Brooklyn College. 
"He who a wolf-cub kept, the beast to tame, 
Was torn to pieces when to Wolfe it came." 

Sadi 



30 





BARNETT YUKOLIS 

"Elchanite" Photography Editor 7, 8; "Elchanite" 
Photography Squad 3-6; Office Squad 7, 8. 
Barney, our shutterbug from the YMHA, was always 
busy photographing ail phases of school life. When 
you combine this with a rigorous schedule of office 
worit and switchboard operating, you have quite a 
"full" man. Rabbi Perlman's protege will continue 
his photographic exploits at Brooldyn College. 
"One picture is worth a thousand words." 

Chinese Proverb 



NORMAN ZABROWSKY 

"Elchanite" Art Squad 7, 8; Mathematics Club 3. 4. 
Nicknamed Zab by Professor Emeritus Landowne, Nor- 
mie starred on his class basketball team for many 
terms. This gifted artist and Chemistry enthusiast 
will continue his studies at Yeshiva University. 
"What art was to the ancient world, science is to the 
modern." 

Disraeli 



HYAM ZUCKERBERG 

Arista Leader 8; Arista Vice-Leader 7; Arista 5-8; 
Student Court 6. "Elchanite" Activities Editor 7, 8; 
"Topics" Copy Editor 5, 7; "Topics" Business Man- 
ager 5, 6; "Kolenu" Writer 6. 8; Class Debating Man- 
ager 2, 7, 8; Class Secretary-Treasurer 5: Service 
Squad 7; Class Debating Team 1-8; School Debating 
Team 3. 5, 6, 8; Hebrew Library 8. 
Zeke, who came "all the way from Forest Hills," was 
one of the best known members of the Senior class. 
His fame was primarily due to outstanding scholastic 
achievement (of course there may have been other less 
significant factors). Extremely good natured, he helped 
shape the school's student-aid program, while serving 
as Arista's Leader. 
"A good heart's wotlh gold." 

Shakespeare 



A / 



■J 






FRESHMEN 



/ i ^'iP 



"•--7 



^ia/Uf 



^z?/ 



Dear Diary, 

/'^••\ / \ \ ^"''' '' / I RECEIVED a letter and was told to report to the 

'^^ *'-^'' / ' gym (well, that's what they called it anyway!) 

/ >"V"'''' '\ for student orientation. ... I walked down Presi- 

'.^ t / v dent Street and stopped at 1060. ... What practical 

j 'i (' •''", -1 joker gave me this address? . . . Walked up to a tall 

I ' ; '. > 1 

I If r i \ nian wearing a black suit and reading The New 

/ \ / i ,' \ York Times. . . . Asked him if he knew the where- 

; ' ' ! r-\ 

\ '■ / 1 -A ,s abouts of Brooklyn Talmudical Academy. ... He 

5 ' 1 !?'' 

I j^ •: told me I was standing in front of it. ... I told him 

he was crazy. ... I finally entered an old auto show- 

^ ^^^^^^ room (Talmudical Academy's gymnasium) and got 

I ^^^y"~. V <,'■:'; l^^M 1 ^ ^ rny fi^^'^ glimpse of Rabbi Abraham N. Zuroff. . . . 

I '■'•'' jX / £ ^^ ^ ^^f J^jfj^^ Oh! Oh! Shouldn't have told that tall man he was 

crazy. . . . We were then put through a process of 
Freshman Orientation (nothing more than an inten- 
sified occidentation). . . . First school day. . . . Af- 
ter being affectionately advised by a hopping science 
teacher to "fail now and avoid the rush," we were 
offered a new course: How to learn Al Hamichya 
for five easy zeros. . . . Herskovics initiates us into 
Club 125 (a dollar and a quarter for an impover- 
ished family in Israel who can't meet the last instal- 
ment on a color television set). . . . School year in- 
■l^"-'\.-\ M'-'' terrupted! . . . We take physicals. . . . No! I've never 

'-.^.'■l <• had trichinosis, diarrhea or goose pimples. . . . We 

'"if ^ * 1 then are told to do a strip-tease. . . . Boy, is that 

jj, / library cold! Somebody sneezes instead of cough- 

'•~J'.'.'J^--'^ "^'-. ing and is immediately sent to Central. (But Rabbi 

\ ■'•>.,.-'' i '"^^ "-^ Zuroff! Couldn't you tell the difference?). . . . Mr. 

Gold keeps reminding us not to put the emphaaasis 

on the wrong syllaaaable. . . . First term tends as 

we beat the Seniors for the school debating cham- 

( •__ Y,.- 1 pionship. . . . New Course! Economic Geography. 

1 ... What is the effect of the Bushmen (otherwise 

^v~- ■^ ^ \ known as Homo-Sohniacs) of Australia on the 

>-^'',^'^f\"''^:^"'^^ bookbinding industry of Israel? . . . Kallner claims 

r--'.'— -'',-' \ that "kesef 'V'zohov lo metahair mamzayrim" — 

' '^-^•'-^ /.< however, if nobody's looking, a little donation to the 

-} \J ^^ K. E. K. Fund (Keren Ezrat Kallner) will remove 

^ / talking marks. . . . Shussie opens a kennel for "me- 

shuganeh hint" who were caught in the firecracker 

\ 
\ 



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■-'.* 




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'r' 



\ y 


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--' 


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■-■t^ 


V "r 




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32 






i 



X-'^." i 



u^ 



investigations. . . . But Mr. Kaliner, don't you trust 
me when I tell you the train stalled and that's why 
I came late? . . . Mr. Bienenstock! "In G-d we trust; 
men pay cash". . . . Rabbi Schechter talks to the 
walls and Zuckerberg answers. . . . Tex Shapiro gets 
into his wagon but next year Seiior will fix it. . . . 
After being told by Dr. Saphire that the no exemp- 
tion ruling sticks, our first year comes to an end. 

SOPHOMORES 

OH no! Not Shussie and Shepsie again! . . . But 
it is, as new ruling promotes rebbies along 
with students. . . . New gym teacher — Mr. Morse. 
... His motto: "Bend! Extend!" . . . Lichty teaches 
us Aleph Beis. ... In bio class we learn all about 
adipose tissue by memorizing the statement: "Don't 
hit a baby in the face; G-d provided a better place." 
. . . New Hebrew teacher. Dr. Eidelberg, speaks 
only Hebrew. . . . His successor, only English. . . . 
The third one doesn't speak. . . . Fourth is a little 
"punchy" but remains. . . . New memory and writ- 
ing courses introduced by the good willed professor. 
. . . First he makes us memorize some Hebraic coun- 
terparts of Evangeline and then he dictates the en- 
tire Hebrew literature book. . . . Attention all! 
Everybody bring your wagons — Serior is fixing 
them. . . . Warns class that twenty-two boys may 
lose as much as a quarter of a point on the Regents. 
A. A. A. invades our Hebrew class as Lichty teaches 
us location of all gas stations in Israel. . . . What's 
this! . . . Some dirty, filthy, no good, low down, rot- 
ten, lying, cowardly, piggish, selfish, stupid, igno- 
rant, idiotic, good-for-nothing, sneakish lout locks 
the Senor out of the room. Senor promises to get to 
the bottom of this for just that! . . . Julie teaches us 
reproduction in only one lesson: You can't cross a 
cow with a cow. Heh! You get bupkiss. . . . Typical 
Lichty period — five boys in class; ten in Teachers" 
Room, searching for certain "valuable" data; fifteen 
standing guard. . . . High Mark Haskel inaugurates 
his "ziro-for-Shapiro" campaign. . . . Mr. Strum 
gives us his famous rendition of "The Mountain 
Whippoorwill". . . . Done even better by Hal Ude- 



witz at our second Variety Nite. . . . We learn all 
about genetics. Julie explains: "To get a sweater 
with pockets ye cross a kangaroo with a sheep. Heh! 
Heh!" . . . Four Star Playhouse is produced in Bob's 
class as The ShifT tops them all with his imitation 
of Jackie Gleason. . . . B.T.A. plays in Garden for 
first time and shows itself well. . . . We take Droo- 
dles (better known as mechanical drawing) in Art. 
. . . We get instructions for Bio Regents: "If ye 
don't know the answer write 'therefore' and you'll 
get half credit." . . . After that we spend last week 
in bio class watching thrilling films on worms, eels, 
donkeys and asses, including candid shots of Mr. 
Kaliner. . . . Our boys begin hitting the political trail 
as Lazar, Dershowitz and Hirt become Secretary- 
Treasurer, Debating Manager and Athletic Man- 
ager, respectively. ... As the year comes to a close, 
Teddy K. plays swami and predicts (rather unsuc- 
cessfully) each student's marks beforehand, on the 
basis of his final exam. Wow! ... A very eventful 
year comes to a close. 




^- 



it ^ 




33 



I 



n s 



WELL, we're Juniors now. . . . Faivy comes 
back from training with Raphael Halpern and 
practices his famous "knip", eye gouging, and hair 
pulling holds on all students who refuse to buy a life 
size map of Israel. Map con- 
tains all minor gas stations the 
good doctor left out. . . . Also 
the location of the new combi- 
nation gas station-restaurants 

on Israeli roads Their motto: 

"Eat here — get gas.". . . Mr. 
Gold reveals a shocking secret: 
He was the star catcher on his 
high school's football team — 
Mr. Wallach predicts that with 
some effort, Zeke has a chance 
to become president of Mars — 
New subject: Chemistry. How 
could you be such a cluck and 
live? . . . How could you be so 
stupid and continue to breathe 
(especially after those hydrogen sulfide experi- 
ments)? . . . After making a record broad jump to 
the top of the blackboard, Lichty's answers become 
"verry wague". . . We lock Kenny out of the room 




but unlike the Senor, he doesn't say anything. In 
fact he thanks us for deciding to let him back in. 
. . . But Mr. Lilker! It wasn't our fault that we found 
the mid-terms in the garbage can two days before 
it was to be given. . . .We learn 
Greek alphabet in Trigonome- 
try After that Septimus con- 
tinuously drops "pupindiculars 
to a surface" for as he says: 

"practice makes pufect" The 

Topics puts out a Purim issue, 
The Tropics. . . . Faivy spends 
three days teaching us how not 
to write a composition.... Kenny 
concedes that once you kill 
Edim Zomimim, they're dead! 
... He then tells us that he's at 
our mercy. . . . We review He- 
brew Regents. True or false: 
The Song of Songs is a song. 
. . . And then the student an- 
swers it wrong. . . . Our Junior Year, the most suc- 
cessful year of our high school career comes to 
an end as we take four Regents. 



34 




SENIORS 

HEY! We're finally Seniors now. And to cele- 
brate the occasion, we move to a new building 
on Church Avenue. . . . Now hear this! Rabbi Yogel 
has decreed that building is too close to Central. 
Therefore a fifty foot steel gate will be erected 
around building to serve as a mechitza. . . . During 
sessions, high voltage electricity will be run through 
gate to discourage trespassers. . . . New history 
teacher — Mr. Nanes. He doesn't use book to teach 
American History; he teaches it from his own eye- 
witness accounts. . . . We still have the Cluck. How- 
ever, this time, instead of messing up some Chem- 
istry experiments, he ruins a few in Physics — just 
to show that he hasn't lost his magic touch. . . . We 
take up Advanced Algebra with Mr. Wallach. He 
repeats his famous proverb daily: "Do not delay. 
Drop Advanced today!" He then keeps on wonder- 
ing why students are so nice when they're Juniors 

and they're Seniors they're such . . . . Mr. 

Nanes gives us vocabulary test on history exam. . . . 
We put on skit entitled, "The Kenny Mutiny" at 
Chanuka Chagiga. . . . Chagiga turns out to be the 
most successful one in B.T.A.'s history. . . . Lebo- 
witz gives us a "make-up" Physics test (a hard test 
to make up for the easy one he gave). . . . Sample 
question: A man jumps off the Empire State Build- 
ing. If it takes him one minute and ten seconds to 
reach the ground, show by means of a diagram and 
Einstein's formula, whether he'll land head first or 




feet first. ... At least this is only a choice question. 
. . . Either you take it or don't take it and fail the 
test. . . . The answer is he won't land; he'll go 
through the sidewalk. . . . Right after results of this 
test are announced, Lebowitz tells us that our class 
will go down in history. . . . Way down. . . . Dinah 
Leviton leaves as new secretary, Helen Cohen, takes 
over. . . . We take Regents Scholarship and College 
Board exams. ... A few boys "forget" to sign 
pledge on College Boards. . . . After a few more 
"make-up" Physics tests, Lebowitz tells us that we're 
all on the same boat ... the 5. 5. Cluck. . . . Oh 
Gosh! The term's ended and so have our high school 
careers. . . . Regents. . . . Graduation. . . . It's all 
over. . . . But when we look back at the times we 
spent in T. A., we realize that they were some of the 
most rewarding and enjoyable experiences in our 
comparatively young lives. . . . We can now say 
with pride that we are Alumni of Brooklyn T. A. 





HONORS 



NEW YORK STATE REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS 

Jerome Blau 
Arthur Cantor 
Arthur Eidelman 
Yehudi Felman 
Berton Lapidus 
Joseph Penner 
Irving Weljeld 



MAYOR'S COMMITTEE AWARD 

TO THE STUDENT WHO RANKS HIGHEST IN HIS HIGH SCHOOL STUDIES 

Hyam Zuckerberg 



NEW YORK JOURNAL AMERICAN 



TOURNAMENT OF ORATORS 
A llan Dershowitz 

SECOND PLACE, 1954 

Eli Lazar 

FIRST PLACE, 1955 



GENERAL MOTORS 

NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP PLAN 

Yehudi Felman 
CERTIFICATE OF MERIT 




/ ACTIVITIES 




37 



G.O 





"^HE General Organization is the main organ of 
' student government. It serves as coordinator of 
the school's numerous extra-curricular activities 
and endeavors to create greater interest on the part 
of the student body in its varied program. 

In the past school year, 1954-1955, two of the 
most successful G.O. terms have been completed. 
Participation in G.O. sponsored extra-curricular 
activities was at an all time high. This widespread 
interest contributed greatly in making this a most 
fruitful year of G.O. accomplishment. 

The highlight of semi-annual G.O. activity is the 
election campaign. The Fall Term elections at- 
tracted much attention, with a "hot" political battle 
taking place. Eli Lazar's copping of the presidency 
made it three successive terms for him as a mem- 
ber of the school G.O. Executive Council. Avi 
Dershowitz, twice a G.O. officer and a very active 
member of the senior class, was his opponent. The 
other victors were Elias Herschmann who defeated 
Artie Eidelman for the vice-presidency, Artie Can- 
tor as Secretary-Treasurer, Steven Riskin as Debat- 
ing Manager, and Jerry Lloyd who became 
Athletic Manager. 



X 



\ 






.♦ai. 




FALL TERM 




Left to right, seated: H. Wasserman, S. Krochmal, A. Cantor, A. Fruchter. E. Lazar, 
E. Herschmann, H. Bursky, J. Greenfield, A. Schiff, R. Newman, H. Gross, M. Strahlberg. 
B. Weinstock, B. Reiss. 
Standing: S. Miller, M. Gordon, A. Balsam, S. Goldman, P. Bursky, M. Strobel, J. Penner. 




The Spring Term elections saw Elias Hersch- 
mann go on to become President. Jack Klein was 
elected Vice-President, Chaim Charytan became 
Secretary-Treasurer and Herman Bursky was voted 
Athletic Manager. Steven Riskin was re-elected to 
serve the school for another term as Debating 
Manager. 



G.O. EXECUTIVE COUNCIL (FAIL TERM) 

Left to right: E. Herschmann, Vice-Presi- 
dent; E. Lazar, President; A. Cantor, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. 




39 




SPRING TERM 



Left to right, seated: Y. Felman, 
S. Krochmal, I. Greenspan, C. 
Charytan, E. Herschmann, J. Klein, 
S. Golshevsky, S. Miller, D. Sieg- 
fried, J. Greenfield, H. Gross, B. 
Adler, S. Ganchrow, M. Freiman. 
Standing: L. Kerschenbaum, H. 
Wasserman, B. Weinstock, M. Lebo- 
witz, J. Nusbacher, S. Sussman. 



Although the G.O.'s accomplishments of the 
past year were numerous, there are certain achieve- 
ments which stand out in our minds. 

The assemblies this year were much more mean- 
ingful than those in the past. The schedule included 
a Freshman Orientation and Awards assembly, an 
Arista Induction assembly, a very colorful and 
enjoyable Chanukah Chagiga, a panel discussion 
with the three Yeshiva University High Schools, 
interscholastic debates with Uptown T.A. and Flat- 
bush Yeshiva, pre-election assemblies, an Israel 
Independence Day assembly, and a Tenth Anni- 
versary celebration. An open G.O. meeting was 
also held before the entire student body. 

The G.O. arranged for pictures to be taken of 
the entire student body. They also distributed new 
G.O. cards, with the students' photos, free of 
charge. 

The G.O.'s annual affairs proved to be very 
successful. These were the Chagiga, Lag B'Omer 



Outing, and Variety Night. This year the G.O. ran 
a special Variety Night Club, under the direction 
of Bob Hirt and Moshe Polansky, which provided 
the entertainment for a very enjoyable evening. 

The G.O. obtained a large cork bulletin board 
for the hall and ten small bulletin boards for the 
classrooms. 

Brooklyn T.A. showed itself well in the many 
inter-Yeshiva tournaments which it entered. B.T.A. 
was an active member of the Inter-Yeshiva Coun- 
cil, a city-wide group of most of the Yeshiva high 
schools of New York. 

Our school was also a member of the Y.U.A.A. 
which sponsors the Jewish High School League. 
B.T.A. won its second successive Brooklyn Divi- 
sion Basketball Championship in the J.H.S.L. 



iN^^OTRftri 



G.O. EXECUTIVb LUUNULMSPRING TERM! 

Left to right: J. Klein, Vice-President; E. Hersch- 
mann, President; C. Charytan, Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 



40 




...STUDENT COURT 



THE Student Court is the judicial brancii of our 
student government. It is composed of five 
Arista members, who sit as judges, and the G.O. 
President, who serves as presiding justice. 

The duty of this court is to pass judgment on 
those accused of violating our school laws and 
regulations. A student, summoned to appear in 
court when charged with a misdemeanor, may 
either speak in his own defense or may choose a 
spokesman. The Service Squad Captain, represent- 
ing the CO., states the case against the defendant. 
The case is then thoroughly discussed and the 
judges decide whether or not the accused is guilty. 
If a student is found to be guilty, the punishment 
is usually detention or the writing of an essay. 

Our Student Court has been a corrective branch 
of our student government and has clearly demon- 
strated the school's policy of letting the students 
govern their own affairs. 





Left to right, se.ated: A. Cantor. Y. Fel- 
man. E. Herschmann. E. Lazar, Mr. J. 
Strum, H. Josepher. 

Standing: N. Bloom. J. Blau. .\. Eidelman, 
B. Lapidus. 



41 




• • i 

t • « 

> • • 




A 



Left to right, front row: J. Schraub, B. Adler, Y. Felman, I. Greenspan, E. Herschmann, 

J. Klein, W. Enker, L. Aberman. 

Second row: L. Goldsmith, S. Goldstein, P. Friedman, M. Schiffenbauer, J. Tager, H. 

Kuritsky, N. Feld, I. Kellman, M. GefFen, J. Loewenthai, S. Riskin, M. Rubenstein. 

Third row: P. Ungar, H. Glalter, A. Hornblass, I. Welfeid, S. Hirsch, A. Hyman, S. 

Grossbard, D. Frimmer, S. Krochmal, J. Lifschitz, A. Lebowitz. 

Fourth row: H. Zuckerberg, N. Gorlyn, A. Feiner, J. Greenfield, M. Zwillenberg, H. 

Kass, N. Kupietsky. 



Sermce Squad 



To MAINTAIN efficient student government, a 
law enforcement body is needed. Such a body 
is the Service Squad. 

This organization is led by two co-captains who 
in turn are responsible to the G.O. Vice-President. 
However, all members of the Service Squad must 
be approved by the G.O. Improvements were insti- 
tuted last year and more lower termers were ad- 
mitted into the Service Squad. 

The Service Squad operates in complete coop- 
eration with the Student Court to maintain deco- 
rum at all assemblies and help keep our school 
clean. There is a Service Squad member available 
in every room during lunch hour to make sure that 
no regulations are broken. This year the Service 



42 




Squad has taken on more responsibilities. More 
members were needed since our present building 
is larger. To prevent accidents, students were cau- 
tioned not to cross the street against the light. No 
student is allowed to leave the building during the 
day. Service Squad members this year also had to 
devote more time to their jobs and had to be on 
post at recess as well as lunchtime. 



Under the effective leadership of Jacob Nus- 
bacher and Irving Greenspan, the Service Squad 
has accomplished its task this year and has operated 
smoothly. Special thanks should be giver, to the 
two officers and to the students who served as 
members and did their job so conscientiously. 
Throughout the year they have been of valuable 
service to the school. 



Left to right, front row: J. Schraub, B. Adler, J. Tager, I Greenspan, J. Klein, J. Nus- 

bacher, W. Enker, L. Abernian. 

Second row: N. Nusbacher, R. Weinberg, J. Pugach, P. Bursky, P. Friedman, J. Loewen- 

thal, P. Halbfinger, I. Blacbior, M. Geffen, I. Kellman, B. Pallant, S. Bockstein. 

Third row: A. Cohen, J. Neufeld, J. Tuch, S. Miller, A. Hornblass, S. Hirsch, A. Hyman, 

S. Grossbard, D. Primmer, S. Krochmal, H. Mandel, H. Gross. 

Fourth row: J. Lifschitz, N. Gorlyn, A. Feiner, J. Lloyd, M. Zwillenberg, H. Elstein, 

A. Fruchter. 




43 



ARISTA 



ARISTA, T.A.'s honor society, is an organiza- 
' tion of students who have met with outstand- 
ing success in both their Hebrew and secular 
subjects. Participation in extra-curricular activities, 
and receiving the approval of Arista's Assembly 
(present membership) and Senate (faculty board) 
are criteria for admission. The group's primary 
purpose is to aid students who are deficient in their 
studies. 





Left to right, seated: M. Goldberg, Y. 
Felman, I. Greenspan, M. Gordon, M. 
Zwillenberg, L. Kerschenbaum, H. 
Josepher, N. Bloom, Mr. S. Lebowitz, J. 
Blau, H. Zuckerberg, A. Eidelman. 
Standing: J. Penner, I. Welfeld, J. Neu- 
geboren, N. Feld, B. Langenauer, E. 
Lazar, A. Witztum, A. Gafni, J. Klein, 
E. Herschmann, B. Lapidus, A. Cantor. 



44 




Left to right, seated: M. Rabinowitz, A. 
Fruchter, P. Bursky, S. Goldstein, H. Mandel, 
N. Bloom, Mr. S. Lebowitz, H. Zuckerberg, 
M. Goldberg. 

Standing: M. Press, J. Nusbacher, H. Farkas, 
N. Kupietsky, A. Hyman, M. Freiman, S. Riskin. 




Arista activities during the past year were high- 
lighted by two school assemblies devoted specifi- 
cally to the induction of new members. New mem- 
bers were presented with pins and certificates and 
were asked to recite the Arista Pledge. The inno- 
vation proved to be of great interest to the entire 
student body. Membership in the honor society 
was increased during the past year from seven to 
an all time high of thirty-six members. Officers for 
the Fall Term were: Jerry Blau, Leader; Hyam 
Zuckerberg, Vice-Leader; Norman Bloom, Secre- 
tary. In the Spring Term Zuckerberg was elected 
Leader, Bloom became Vice-Leader and Morris 
Goldberg was chosen Secretary. Since Arista's in- 
ception, Mr. Samuel Lebowitz has been its Faculty 
Adviser. 



45 




squad 



PROGRESS has been the keyword of the Elcha- 
nite throughout the years. Each Elchanite has 
proved to be superior to the previous issues. 

From copy preparation to final printing, much 
effort and cooperation are required. The Elchanite 
is run by a board, and only through its cooperation 
can it succeed. The business managers are in 
charge of securing advertisements to finance our 
yearbook. The activities editors organize the write- 
ups for each student as well as all school activities. 
The photography crew takes all candid pictures of 
school events, and the art editors illustrate the 
book completely. It is the task of these editors, 
under the Editor-in-Chief, to produce the book. 



The editors wish to express their appreciation to 
Mr. Harry Allan, our Art and General Adviser, 
and to Mr. Robert Ba.ssell, Literary Adviser, for 
their unselfish cooperation in helping to make the 
Elchanite a success. Our gratitude also goes to all 
associate editors and members of the art and typ- 
ing squads who have helped make our yearbook 
complete. The following students are to be ex- 
tended special plaudit: ART SQUAD — Morton 
Freiman, Stanley Krochmal, Howard Burg, Joshua 
Levy, Abraham Schiff, Norman Zabrowsky, Aaron 
Fruchter. TYPING SQUAD— iack Klein— Edi- 
tor, Chaim Charytan, Yehudi Felman, Morris 
Goldberg, Philip Halbfinger. 




Left to right, SEATED: T. Groner, J. Nus- 
bacher, D. Aberbach, Mr. Allan, S. Kroch- 
mal, L. Goldsmith. 
Standing: H. Burg, J. Klein, M. Freiman. 



Kolenu 




Left to right: M. Rabinowitz, Rabbi Epstein, H. Wasserman. 



APPEARING after Shavuot, Kolenu, B.T.A.'s 
' Hebrew literary magazine, is an annual stu- 
dent publication eagerly awaited by every student. 
This year, although not following any specific 
theme, the editorial staff saw fit to include in this 
publication a greater variety of articles, with special 
emphasis placed on items which can aid the stu- 
dents in their Hebrew studies. A special section, 
devoted to school activities, was found extremely 
novel, since events were reported for the first time 
in a vivid yet simple Hebrew style. 

Kolenu, which has been widely acclaimed among 
Yeshiva circles, received special commendation 
last year by the nationally famous "Jewish Life," 
a monthly publication of the Union of Orthodox 
Jewish Congregations of America. In a review by 
Mr. Sidney Rosenberg entitled "A Serious Voice" 
the author analyzed many of the articles which 
comprised the contents of Kolenu. 




47 



TOPICS 




EDITORIAL BOARD 

Left to right, seated; G. Falk, 1. Welfeld, 

D. Frimmer, M. Goldberg, M. Gordon, L. 

Rubin, C. Charytan, Y. Felman, M. Rabino- 

witz. 

Standing: H. Zuckerberg, J. Neugeboren, 

J. Ness, J. Tager, N. Bloom. 



COMPLETING its second year of successful 
publication since changing from a photo-offset 
to a printed newspaper, B.T.A.'s student voice, the 
TOPICS, has shown tremendous improvement. A 
highlight of the past year is the high rating it re- 
ceived in the Columbia Scholastic Press Associa- 



tion competition. 

The TOPICS circulates 1,000 copies among the 
students of B.T.A., Uptown T.A. and Central. It 
is published by the Journalism Club and was 
headed this past year by Martin Gordon, Editor- 
in-Chief. Mr. Sidney Gold is the faculty adviser. 



48 



REPORTERS 

Left to right, seated; S. Golshev- 
sky, M. Press. J. Schraub. S. Riskin, 
M. Gordon, W. Enker, J. Hornblass, 
A. Kezsbom. 

Standing: G. Roth, M. Strobel, A. 
Balsam, B. Weinstock, Mr. Gold, 
J. Schnure, A. Witty, R. Weber, A. 
Cantor. 





THE Topics Bulletin is the latest addition to the 
growing family of T. A. Publications. This mim- 
eographed paper serves a dual purpose: it provides 
both a weekly roundup of school news, and a means 
of communication between the G.O. administra- 
tion and the student body. 

The Bulletin was ably directed this year by 
Messrs. M. Gordon, Y. Felman, M. Goldberg, and 
C. Charytan. 



BULLETIN 




Left to right: Y. Felman. C. Charylan. M. Gordon. M. Goldberg. 



49 



DEBATING 



THE Debating Society at B.T.A. controls both 
inter-school and intramural debates. Intramu- 
ral debates are divided into two leagues — one in- 
cludes terms one to four, the other includes terms 
five through eight. Each class participates in five 
debates in its own league. The winner of one league 
then debates against the winner of the second 
league for the school championship. 




Left lo nghl. seated: M. Goldberg. A. Hornblass, 
A. Dershowitz, S. Riskin, B. Langenauer, J. Neuge- 
boren, H. Burg. 

Standing: C. Charytan, E. Herschmann, E. Lazar, 
I. Greenspan, Y. Felman. 



FALL TERM 




This year B.T.A. scored an impressive record m 
inter-school debating. Among our victories can be 
listed one of our major rivals. Uptown T.A. Inter- 
school debating was highlighted by a panel discus- 
sion between the three Yeshiva University High 
Schools which was held at B.T.A. The representa- 
tives of these schools discussed the possibility of 
the re-establishment of a Sanhedrin in Israel. Dr. 



50 



Sidney Hoenig, an authority on this topic, was our 
guest speaker. 

A public speatcing club, with the purpose of aid- 
ing school and class debators, holds a prominent 
place in our debating program. During the school 
year many assemblies were held at which school 
debates, as well as class debates were featured. 
These assemblies helped promote interest in de- 
bating at T.A. 




SPRIB^G TERM 



Left to right, seated: J. Neuge- 
boren, H. Zuckerberg, M. Gold- 
berg, A. Hornblass, I. Kellman, 
A. Hyman, E. Lazar. 
Standing: J. Hornblass, H. Burg, 
A. Dershowitz, B. Langenauer, 
S. Riskin. 





^<vUet(f nite 




52 



The show was very ably supervised by its faculty 
adviser, Mr. Martin Liiicer. 

The proceeds from the sale of Variety Night 
tickets are of great financial help to the CO., as 
they constitute its major source of income during 
the year. 




Left to right: C. Charytan, A. Can 
tor, H. Burg, K. Kobrin, H. Was 
serman, M. Polansky, M. Ruben 
stein, A. Eidelman. 




LIBRARY 



Left to right, seated: J. Loewen- 
thai, S. Katz, R. Weber, A. Lebo- 
witz, M. Goldberg, A. Hyman, 
J. Klapper. 

Standing: S. Weiser, S. Suss- 
man, H. Kuritsky, S. Goldrich, 
J. Wolicki, A. Schiff, J. Parness, 
J. Neufeld. 



THE activity that suffered the greatest incon- 
venience by our moving to the new building, 
was the English Library. Forced to uproot itself 
from its previous location, the library needed a 
complete overhauling and had to be rearranged. 
The staff was also hampered by the fact that new 
bookcases were not built until the second term. 

Nevertheless, the library improved immensely. 
Easily accessible bookcases were added and a 
separate large reading-room was provided. Books 
covering many new fields were obtained by the 
library squad through grants and book-clubs. 
Especially important was the addition of a better 
reference section. The library also subscribes to 
many leading magazines. 

Throughout the past year, the library has issued 
a mimeographed bulletin containing book reviews, 
listings of new books and other valuable informa- 
tion. The student body thanks Mr. B. Brender, 
faculty adviser, Aaron Lebowitz and Robert Weber, 
chief librarians and the complete library squad. 



English 




54 



THOSE who visited the Hebrew Library, housed 
in its two small rooms in our former school 
building and saw its new spacious location, will 
marvel at the way the library has adapted itself to 
serve a greater number of students. 

In order to establish an efficient system of classi- 
fication, the librarian. Rabbi Epstein, published a 
fourteen page manual dealing with the technical 
aspects of library work. By the use of this manual. 



a uniform system will be maintained by all the 
squads that are changed yearly. 

The library's bulletin, "The Sifriyon," appeared 
this year and was superior in quality as well as 
quantity as compared to previous editions. The 
bulletin included material condensed from many 
complicated texts to be used in conjunction with 
the Talmud studies in the Yeshiva department. 



illlllijib. 

liliL.i!iO''"toiLi 



Hebrew 





Left to right: M. Press. N. Reiss, J. Gross- 
man, Rabbi Epstein, J. Schnure. S. Eider, 
M. Mednick, H. Goodman, M. Strahlberg, 
F. Nathan. 



55 



VARSITY 



BROOKLYN Talmudical hoopsters for the third 
time placed first in the Brooklyn Division of 
the Metropolitan Jewish High School Basketball 
League. In the semi-final playoff game for League 
leadership, the team lost a thrilling one point over- 
time tussle to R.J. J. 55-54. The game featured a 
second half comeback drive by B.T.A. which 
wiped out a seventeen point half-time deficit, thus 
sending the game into overtime. This set the stage 
for R.J.J.'s Leon Bernstein to drop in a foul shot 
with three seconds to go thus eliminating B.T.A. 
from the playoffs. 




basketball 





56 




On the way to first place in the Brooklyn Divi- 
sion, B.T.A. compiled an 8-1 League record. The 
only defeat was a mid-season upset by HILL The 
toughest opposition came from Flatbush and 
Ramaz who were defeated 50-53 and 45-39 re- 
spectively. In non-League tilts a not so impressive 
5-3 record was compiled. Defeat came at the hands 
of Brooklyn Friends and Rhodes Academy. 

A comparatively low total of 15 Varsity letters 
was awarded as the team compiled an overall 13-5 
record. High scorers for the season were Marv 
Hirschhorn and Nissim Wernick, with 254 and 
191 points respectively. The high scorer for any 
single game was Marv Hirschhorn who scored 29 
points against St. Leonard. 



Season's Scoring Totals 



Hirschhorn 


254 


Wernick 


191 


Bursky 


180 


Welfeld 


167 


Lloyd 


140 


Farkas 


103 


Hirt 


65 


Josepher 


47 


Trugman 


12 


Eidelman 


9 


Pol 


ansky 


7 


Falk 


5 


Dershowitz 


4 


Langenauer 


2 


Season 


Record 




53 


Alumni 


48 


49 


R.J.J. 


31 


77 


Flatbush 


53 


63 


Chaim Berlin 


51 


78 


St. Leonards 


71 


78 


HILI 


58 


68 


St. Leonards 


59 


94 


Bentley 


52 


57 


Brooklyn Friends 


72 


48 


HILI 


53 


75 


Bentley 


52 


73 


Chaim Berlin 


66 


95 


M.T.J. 


44 


59 


Rhodes 


65 


58 


Flatbush 


53 


45 


Ramaz 


39- 


62 


Brooklyn Friends 


81 


54 


R.J.J. 


55' 


1185 




1016 


* League (13-5) 




** Playoff 






Irving Welfeld and Marvin Hirschhorn. 
Varsity Co-Captains 



In the second annual All Star Game B.T.A. was 
represented by Irving Welfeld, Herm Bursky, 
Nissim Wernick and Marv Hirschhorn. Coach Hal 
letter piloted the Brooklyn squad for the second 
straight year. Special thanks to Moishe Reiss, Joe 
Tuch and Danny Frimmer, team Managers. 




/.('/' lo rifiht. kneeling: D. Frim- 
mer. H. F:trkas. L Welfeld. M 
Hirschhorn. H. Bursk\. I Lloyd 
N. Wernick. 

Standing: M. Reiss, G. Falk. H 
Josepher, R. Hirt. J. Tuch. A 
Dershowitz, B. Langenauer. A 
Eidelman, L. Trugman. 







-;. -5< 




V 





^\ 



V^/l^itU^ IN AC 



58 





JoV, 




THIS past year witnessed a decline in the activity 
of the Junior Varsity. Hampered by the lack of 
an official coach and the absence of facilities suit- 




f^ 



/-% fs 



1 1: > < "■ 








Left to right, seated: P. Bursky. A. Fruchter, R. Goldberg. K. Kobrin. A. Kirshbaum. 

S. Krochmal, H. Lerner, M. Polansky. 

Standing: M. Shimansky. L. Rubin. M. Ostrow. J. Levine. M. Kaplan, J. Neugeboren. 

able for practice, the J. V. managed to play a total of 
only three games. These contests consisted of a 
match between the Shields S. A. C, representing 
the Young Israel of Boro Park, and two against 
their perennial rival, Brooklyn Friends Academy 
J. V. A record of two wins and one defeat was 
compiled, the only J. V. loss coming at the hands 
of the Shields. Seasonal scoring totals show Mike 
Ostrow and Larry Rubin to be the leading J. V. 
point-getters. 

It is hoped that a more extensive J. V. program 
will be planned for the forthcoming season. This is 
most essential, as the Varsity is dependent upon 
the J. V. for its future talent. 



59 



Intra- Mural 




INTRAMURAL competition rebounded to a new 
high this year. The programs of Athletic Man- 
agers Herman Bursky and Jerry Lloyd consisted of 
competition in baseball, basketball, slapball, ping- 
pong, handball, and foul shooting. 

As usual, the Lag B'Omer outing culminated 
this year's Athletic season. The outing featured an 
Alumni-Senior softball game and the finals of the 
intramural baseball tournament. Other competi- 
tion in handball and tennis was held. 

Through this extensive intramural program 
every student is given the opportunity to partici- 
pate in whatever sport he desires. 

Winners in Intramural Competition, 1954-1955 

Baseball — 8a 

Basketball — 6a 

Slapball — 8a 

Foulshooting — 8a — /. Klein, M. Polansky, 

J. Lipshitz 
Handball— P. Halbfinger 
Ping-Pong — A. Jacknin 




store 




Lejl to right, seated: P. Halbfinger, A. Gafni, A. 
Hornblass, B. Langenauer, M. Feiner, H. Burg, A. 
Witztum, H. Farkas. 

Standing: D. Levine, H. Wasserman, M. Rabinowitz, 
C. Charytan, O. Wachstock, F. Danziger. 



THIS marks the cooperative's first complete year 
of activity in the new building. This store, run 
by the students and sponsored by the CO., is 
equipped to supply the student body with nil the 
necessary school supplies and review books at 
greatly reduced prices. 

Any student interested in joining the staff may 
do so at the beginning of each term. This is an- 
other outstanding example of student government 
in action at T.A. 

This year the Co-op operated under the leader- 
ship of Hyam Wasserman in the Fall Term and 
David Levine in the Spring Term. Through the 
patronage of the student body the co-op has be- 
come a success. 





Co-op Store Executives: H. Wasserman, H. Farkas. D. Levine. M. Rabinowitz. 




61 




THE BEGINNING 



TORAH 



all in a day 






CURRENT EVENTS 



ADMIT ANYONE? 





AH BECHINA 



CAFETERIA STYLE 



^ SCIENCE 







READING MAKETH A FULL MAN 



CORNERED 





LITERATURE 



7 

/ 



65 




T.A. 



% V/HILE ten years represents an important seg- 
'' ■ ment in tiie life of an individual, in the his- 
tory of an institution of learning it is less significant. 
Yet the stature of an institution and the role it is 
destined to play are determined to a large extent 
by the foundations established in its early begin- 
nings and the guiding philosophy that motivates 
its early growth. In looking ahead it is wise to 
appraise past experiences and to assess their value 
in shaping the future. A sine qua non for prospect 
is retrospect. What is the story of the Brooklyn 
Talmudical Academy — its origin and development? 
To better understand its establishment, it is 
necessary that we view it as an integral part of 
Yeshiva University, which today is undoubtedly 
the outstanding institution of its kind in the world. 
It is the prophetic vision and indomitable will of 



Dr. Samuel Belkin, its President since 1943, that 
are responsible for its almost unparalleled expan- 
sion. It is he who is still applying himself a.ssidu- 
ously to the task of making Yeshiva the kind of 
institution that will be geared to meet effectively the 
complex spiritual, moral, and intellectual needs of 
the American Jewish Community. It is within such 
a framework of thought and action that Brook- 
lyn Talmudical Academy was conceived and born. 
But more specifically it was designed to expand 
the frontiers of a Yeshiva education on the high 
school level, in the Borough of Brooklyn. That 
this was not merely a luxury but a pressing need 
was evident from the sad, yet true, facts. Each 
year a preponderant majority of elementary Ye- 
shiva graduates, totaling several hundred, would 
discontinue their Jewish studies. While it is true 



66 



that there were several Yeshiva High Schools in 
existence, there were a number of factors that 
militated against continuation in these schools. 
Brooklyn Talmudical Academy, by its establish- 
ment in September 1945, not only met this chal- 
lenge but helped to create a "zeitgeist," which 
made continuation of Jewish studies a normal 
rather than an abnormal phenomenon. This spirit 
began to flourish and gain strength, with the result 
that more Yeshiva High Schools have been opened 
and several elementary Yeshivos have inaugurated 
ninth grades with a view towards building com- 
plete four-year high schools. 

What has been the success of our school? Estab- 
lished for the purpose of fostering the study of 
Talmud, Bible, and cognate subjects among grad- 
uates of elem.entary Yeshivos, who heretofore dis- 
continued their Jewish training, the school has 



ates have won 47 State Scholarships in the last five 
years, each worth $1400.00. Our students have 
excelled in various fields of study, competing suc- 
cessfully in many contests. Several have received 
Honorable Mention Awards in the Annual Science 
Talent Search, in which close to 15,000 students 
compete each year. In the Journal-American His- 
tory Contest, Brooklyn Talmudical Academy has 
won first place among all Yeshiva High Schools 
for five successive years. In the National French 
Contest sponsored by the National Association of 
French Teachers, in which 30,000 students from 
over 800 high schools throughout the country par- 
ticipate annually, our students have won many 
prizes. The crowning achievement in this compe- 
tition was the awarding of a first prize to one of 
our students, who received official recognition as 
the outstanding third-year French student in the 
entire nation. 



in retrospect 



made tremendous strides. For not only has this 
aim been achieved, but we have also been success- 
ful in influencing close to 80 per cent of our gradu- 
ates to continue with their Jewish training on the 
college level. It is significant that almost 70 per 
cent of our alumni have enrolled at Yeshiva Uni- 
versity, while 10 per cent enrolled in municipal 
colleges and are continuing their Jewish learning 
in other Yeshivos. The remainder of the graduates 
are represented by those who were interested in 
specialized fields and who were admitted to Colum- 
bia, Princeton, Cornell, Yale, Harvard, Brooklyn 
Polytechnic Institute, Cooper Union, Carnegie 
Tech and others. Periodically we receive reports on 
the excellent work being done by our graduates 
in these colleges. In addition to various scholar- 
ships awarded by individual colleges, our gradu- 



By RABBI ABRAHAM N. ZUROFF 




67 



This record of achievement is even more re- 
maricable when one considers the heavy scholastic 
schedule which begins at 9:00 in the morning and 
ends at 6:00 in the evening. Nor does this include 
the gamut of extracurricular activities highlighted 
by the Elchanite, senior year book, and the Topics, 
school newspaper, both of which have annually 
been entered into the Columbia Scholastic Press 
Association Competition, and have always emerged 
with awards of merit. Our Hebrew publication, 
Kolenu, has received outstanding tributes of praise 
for its rich content and fine style. It is the combi- 
nation of an intensive program of Jewish studies 
and a maximum program of secular subjects, plus 
the extracurricular activities, that have contributed 
to the spiritual, intellectual, and personal develop- 
ment of our students. 

An ideal program in itself, however, cannot be 
implemented unless both faculty and students are 
geared to participate in it. It requires a dedicated 
staff and a unique student body. Our instructors 
represent a group of competent and conscientious 
men who are sincerely interested in a personal way 
in their students. To them a student is not merely 
a seat-occupant, but an individual who will derive 
benefit from spiritual inspiration, intellectual stim- 
ulation, and character training. A number of fac- 
ulty members are graduates of Yeshiva University, 
and thus they are living symbols of the Yeshiva 
ideal — an harmonious blending of Torah and sec- 
ular culture. Our student body is a select group 
that has met rigid entrance requirements. Entrance 
examinations for both the Yeshiva and high school 
departments, past elementary school records, rec- 
ommendation of principals, and a personal inter- 
view are the gauges used to determine the 
eligibility of the applicant. Such a policy of selec- 
tion is possible, without fear that the rejection of 
candidates will deny them a Jewish education, be- 
cause of the number of other Yeshiva high schools 
in Brooklyn that are accessible to them. Thus, 
with a homogeneous and small student body, an 
atmosphere of learning is created which is con- 



ducive to the finest development of our students. 

There is one more element — the physical aspect 
— which cannot be overlooked. It is true that Jew- 
ish tradition has always emphasized the spiritual 
rather than the material, yet the physical structure 
of a school is an essential ingredient of positive 
value. Having operated the school under the most 
adverse conditions for nine years, we are indeed 
grateful for the building that we are occupying 
since September 1954. Consisting of large, well- 
lighted, and airy classrooms, a beautiful audito- 
rium, adequate library rooms, and a spacious 
playground, this building will further enhance our 
prospects for even greater success. 

In marking the tercentenary of Jewish life in 
America as expressed in its theme, "Man's Oppor- 
tunities and Responsibilities Under Freedom", 
Yeshiva University, in general, and Brooklyn Tal- 
mudical Academy, in particular, are symbols of 
this unique freedom — the freedom not merely to 
become integrated into the fabric of American 
society and to contribute to its economic, political 
and social structure, but the freedom also to retain 
our own religious identity and to withstand assim- 
ilation, by building our own institutions of learning 
and worship, thereby nourishing and sustaining 
those wells that have preserved us as a people since 
the days of antiquity. We are indeed beginning the 
fourth century of Jewish living in the United States 
with the strength and courage to develop further 
those concepts that will prevent us from becoming 
a part of the sandheap and indiscriminate mass. It 
is to this uniqueness that Brooklyn Talmudical 
Academy will continue to contribute. 




68 



DUAL ALLEGIANCE? 



by ELI LAZAR 



LONG before the establishment of the State of 
■ Israel, the question of dual loyalty on the part 
of the American Jew agitated a great deal of 
public opinion, both pro and con. Can the Jew 
be a loyal American citizen and at the same time 
show an interest in Israel? Is he not displaying a 
so-called "dual allegiance"? These are questions 
which have been and will continue to be debated 
in the course of American-Jewish history. It would 
be well for us to consider briefly, some of the 
important concepts of American life which bear 
weight upon this problem. 

America derives her greatness in that she 
represents a synthesis of foreign elements with 
varying ideologies, each contributing toward our 
democratic ideals. We look forward to and en- 
courage the immigrant's contribution in the 
strengthening of our political, social, economic, 
and cultural structures. But, despite this unique 
and far-reaching contribution by the newcomer 
to the growth of American civilization, it is not 
difficult to comprehend that if America is to re- 
main strong, she must command the loyalty of all 
her citizens. New inhabitants must eventually 
shrug off — for the most part — their allegiance to 
foreign powers and must display a positive willing- 
ness to become an inherent part of the homogene- 
ity of the American group. 

Into this framework of American existence, we 
can readily place the Jew. That he has contributed 
to the progress of this country, in practically every 
field of human creativity, is an indisputable fact. 
Furthermore, he has displayed the positive willing- 
ness to be loyal to the American way and has 
identified himself with nearly every movement that 
embodies the spirit of true Americanism. 

However, a "dual allegiance" problem seems to 



have arisen with regard to the feelings of Ameri- 
can Jews toward the establishment of a Jewish 
state. A simple on-the-surface reply to those who 
are bothered by this problem is that the Jews are 
loyal Americans in the same way as Americans of 
Irish, Polish, or French origin who have an affirm- 
ative attitude toward "the old country." This com- 
monplace statement, however, is not an answer to 
the problem. The Jew cannot be considered a 
member of a "normal" immigrant group, just as 
Israel cannot be considered a "normal" foreign 
country. The Jew who entertains the notion that 
his people and his state are similar in purpose and 



relationship to all other peoples and states, is thus 
surrendering his religious principles, his highest 
aspirations. 

The essence of Jewish Zionism is crystallized 
in the principle: "Let the Jewish state perish if it 
abandons the moral idea." The main element in 
the longing for the Return was the desire to remain 
Jewish. Palestine had a definitely ideal character, 
where the Jewish spirit could evolve and where 
the Divine Glory would be present. Thus, when a 
Jew was faced with the question of national loyalty 
in a diaspora nation and with his feelings toward 



69 



Zion, he could not synthesize the two on an equal 
basis. As Maurice Samuel explains in his book 
The Gentleman and The Jew, "A man's business 
is to make his patriotism fit into G-d, not G-d into 
his patriotism." 

It cannot suffice to say that we belong to a for- 
eign national group which is perpetrating an influ- 
ence within the United States that is foreign and 
un-American. We are rather a religious group, 
which, according to the ideals of American democ- 
racy, is to be afforded complete freedom of wor- 
ship. It is right for the Polish Jew migrating to 
America to shrug off his allegiance to Poland; 
it is correct for the Russian Jew to absolve his 
loyalty to Russia; but it is inconsistent with Amer- 
ican democracy to ask the Jew to abandon an 
inherent part of his religion. In our faith, we can 
neither overlook nor underemphasize the impor- 
tance of Israel as a homeland for our brethren. 
Thus, we are no longer faced with the shrugging 
off of "allegiance to foreign powers"; we are con- 
cerned rather with adherence to religious princi- 
ples and with the fundamental American doctrine 
of freedom of religion as expressed in our Bill of 
Rights. Just as Catholicism has the right to look 
to the papal regime in Rome for domination and 
spiritual guidance, Judaism has the right to look 
to Israel — the "seat" of its religion. 

Jews do not go to Israel to become a nation; 
they go because they are a nation. Being a nation, 
they have the right to exist if they so desire. 
Should, however, the major part of the Jewish 
people be unable to settle in Israel, this does not 
mean that this particular section must cease to 
exist as a national group. The right of a national 
minority to live an independent national existence 
side by side with a national majority, in a country 
in which the minority finds itself, is an essential 
principle in the comprehensive understanding of 
freedom. It does not constitute a clash of loyalties. 
What we should realize, is that we owe our alle- 
giance to both America and Israel. It is right that 
a Jew should be loyal to his own people and it is 



right that he be loyal to the state whose citizen 
he is. 

The only question then remaining is whether 
or not these two existing and necessary loyalties 
are compatible. If they are not, the conflict is 
insoluble; one must surrender to the other. How- 
ever, it is our feeling that the.se loyalties are far 
from being incompatible. Many believe that loy- 
alty is a social phenomenon which has thus far 
gone through three phases — the biological-tribal, 
the politico-national, and the universal-moral, in 
the first stage, man's loyalty to his family, to his 
clan or to his tribe was all that mattered, every- 
thing else being alien and unimportant. In the next 
phase, the politico-national, man developed tend- 
encies toward nationalism and intense patriotism 
with all his objectives centered around loyalty to 
his nation. His motto was: "Let the state live, at 
any cost to any idea." The post-war trials of Nazis 
and Fascists on charges of crimes committed 
against humanity, constitute the beginning of a 
new development in the loyalty idea. The accept- 
ance of the principle of loyalty to mankind ac- 
knowledges that in case of conflict between 
loyalties, the commands of universal-moral loyalty 
have precedence over politico-national loyalty. 

Loyalty for Israel is not directed against any 
nation; nor do we believe that the loyalty of the 
citizen to America implies enmity or excludes 
friendship for any other nation. Both loyalties, 
that of the subject for his State and that of the 
Jew for his Jewish nation, can dwell together in 
harmony. We have reached the stage at which the 
vital issues of mankind are settled above the 
national level. In a period when this concept of 
universal-morality is binding, we Jews feel that 
there is absolutely no conflict between the moral 
doctrines of Americanism and Judaism. As the 
late Chief Justice Louis D. Brandeis — himself a 
shining example of the integration of Americanism 
and Zionism — pointed out in his often quoted 
statement: "Multiple loyalties are objectionable 
only if they are inconsistent." 



70 



OSCAR STRAUS: 





THE tercentenary of Jewish settlement in Amer- 
ica has been spotlighted by Jewish contribu- 
tions in almost every field of human endeavor. 
Not the least significant of these are the accom- 
plishments of American Jews in the spheres of 
politics and public service. Jews have served in 
all branches of the municipal, state and federal 



By ABRAHAM WITTY 



governments. They have been appointed to the 
diplomatic corps of the federal government, to 
the federal judiciary, and have been elected to the 
national legislative bodies. But it is noteworthy 
that only two Jews have attained positions in the 
presidential cabinet. These were Oscar S. Straus 
and Henry Morgenthau, Jr. It is into the biography 
of the former that we shall delve, in an effort to 
extract his significant contributions to the Ameri- 
can-Jewish scene and to better understand the 
reasons for his individual greatness. 

Oscar Solomon Straus, born in Ottenburg. Ba- 
varia on December 23. 1850, was of distinguished 
aiTO«i|al background. His great-grandfather, Jacob 
ben Lazarus, had served as a deputy on the famous 
Sanhedrin, convened by Napoleon in 1806. It was 
ben Lazarus who, as a member of a committee of 
nine, helped formulate the conclusions which were 
later accepted by the Assembly and presented to 
Napoleon. 

The father, Lazarus Straus, an active participant 
in the German revolutionary movement of 1848, 
migrated to the United States and settled in Phila- 
delphia. Upon achieving success as a dry goods 
merchant, he was able to bring the rest of his fam- 
ily to this country. Arriving in 1854 were: his wife, 
three sons — Isidore, Nathan, and Oscar, and a 
daughter, Hermina. 

Young Straus' early religious background came 
mainly from his father. He did however attend a 
Baptist Sunday school for a short lime, where he 
studied Bible and the Old Testament. .-\t the age 
of eleven, while a resident of Georgia, he entered 
Collinsworth Institute, a higher school for boys. 



71 



There he mastered the three "r's" and received an 
elementary introduction to the classics. He then 
went on to Columbia Law School from whence he 
was graduated in 1873. 

Upon his graduation from Columbia, Oscar 
Straus became a partner in his father's glassware 
business. Soon thereafter he attained prominence 
as a civic leader, and by 1887, was appointed 
Minister to Turkey by President Grover Cleveland. 

The situation in Turkey was one of gravest con- 
cern. The Mohammedans had closed 500 Ameri- 
can Mission Schools and four American colleges. 
At first, Cleveland displayed a skeptical attitude 
toward sending a Jew to protect Christian church 
interests abroad. But his doubts were soon dissi- 
pated when Straus was openly endorsed by the 
Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions. Perhaps 
one of the strongest commendations for Straus 
and for his people came from Henry Ward Beecher, 
the foremost Brooklyn minister at the time, who 
wrote Cleveland: 

"Some of our best citizens are solicitous for the 
appointment of Oscar Straus as Minister to Turkey — 
of his fitness there is a general consent that he is 
personally and in attainment excellent. 

"But I am interested in another quality — the fact that 
he is a Hebrew. The bitter prejudice against Jews 




which obtains strength in many parts of Europe, 
ought not to receive any countenance in America. It 
is because he is a Jew that I would urge the appoint- 
ment as a fit recognition of this remarkable people 
who are becoming large contributors to American 
propriety and whose intelligence, morality, and large 
liberality in all public measures for the welfare of 
society, should receive from the hands of our Gov- 
ernment some such recognition . . ." 

Shortly after arriving in Turkey, Straus suc- 
ceeded in gaining the reopening of the Mission 
Schools and the colleges. His stay in the country 
was highlighted by many concessions elicited from 
the Turkish governor. On one occasion he refused 
an invitation to meet with the governor declaring 
that he will have nothing to do with him "so long 
as poor Jews who have done nothing are kept in 
prison." The governor, apparently fearing inter- 
national censure, acceded to Straus' demands and 
four hundred Jewish, American, French, German, 
Austrian, and English prisoners were released. 

Straus was still to be summoned to diplomatic 
duty by other American presidents. In 1898, Pres- 
ident William McKinley sent him to visit the Sul- 
tan of Turkey. The purpose of the mission was to 
have the Sultan influence the Mohammedans living 
in the Philippines to recognize the sovereignty of 
the United States. 

In 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt ap- 
pointed Straus to succeed ex-President Harrison as 
a member of the Permanent Court of Arbitration 
at the Hague. Roosevelt later advised Straus that 
he intended to make him a member of his cabinet, 
stating: 

"I have a very high estimate of your judgment and 
your ability and 1 want you for personal reasons. 
There is still a further reason: I want to show Russia 
and some other countries what we think of the Jews 
in this country." 

Roosevelt made these remarks immediately after 
the famous Kishenev massacres of 1903. At the 
peace conference of 1905, at Portsmouth, Straus 
met with Count Sergius Witte, the Czar's repre- 
sentative. A great deal was discussed at that time 



72 



regarding the alleviation of the plight of Russian 
and Polish Jewry. 

The following year Oscar Solomon Straus be- 
came the third Secretary of Labor and Commerce, 
thereby heading the newest governmental depart- 
ment to receive cabinet status (created by Con- 
gress in 1 903 ) . The duties of the department were 
to promote commerce, mining, manufacturing, 
shipping, the fishery industry, and immigration. 
Even though the responsibility was extensive, 
Straus managed to make his department a pros- 
perous one. He concentrated his efforts on the 
removal of certain hardships and injustices attend- 
ing the arrival of immigrants into this country. 

Straus was to continue his diplomatic work in 
Turkey once again when in 1909, President Wil- 
liam Howard Taft through Secretary of State 
Knox appointed him United States Ambassador 
to Turkey. 

Straus also established himself as an author and 
lecturer. Among his books are: The Origin of the 
Republican Form of Government and Roger Wil- 
liams: the Pioneer of Religious Liberty. It must 
be remembered, however, that throughout his 
career as a statesman, author, lecturer, and bus- 
inessman he remained a loyal member of the syna- 
gogue and a staunch supporter of Jewish causes. 
A devoted student of American-Jewish history, 
Straus was one of the founders of the American- 
Jewish Historical Society and served as its first 
president from 1892-1898. Among his many Jew- 
ish accomplishments and affiliations are numbered 
the following: he was a trustee and a member of 
the publication board of the Jewish Publication 
Society of America; a member of the executive 
board of the American Jewish Committee; a direc- 
tor of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum in New York; 
and a leader in the formation of the Young Men's 
Hebrew Association in New York. Together with 
Baron de Hirsch, he established the Jewish Agri- 
cultural Society, the Clara de Hirsch Home for 
Girls, and the Baron de Hirsch Fund, of which he 
was a trustee. 



A Zionist at heart, Straus met with Theodore 
Herzl in Vienna in 1889 and suggested that per- 
sonal negotiations be arranged with Constantino- 
ple, which held sovereignty over Palestine, rather 
than reliance upon intermediaries. He also sug- 
gested Mesopotamia as a possible area for Jewish 
settlement. 

In 1907, with a large bequest left by Moses 
Aaron Dropsie, a post-graduate school of Jewish 
studies was founded in Philadelphia. Besides the 
Dropsie estate, Oscar Straus and Cyrus Adler were 
responsible for bringing about the establishment 
of the Dropsie College for Hebrew and Cognate 
Learning. Tuition at the school was to be free and 
there were to be no restrictions upon race, creed, 
color, or sex. Straus' efforts on behalf of the col- 
lege continued for many years, while he served as 
a governor of the school. 

In recognition for his service to the country and 
for his philanthropic endeavors, Oscar Straus was 
the recipient of honorary degrees conferred upon 
him by Columbia and Brown Universities. A 
memorial was erected in his honor in front of the 
new buildings of the Commerce Department. Oscar 
S. Straus died on May 3, 1926, with the distinc- 
tion of having served presidents but at the same 
time, never having deserted his people. This was 
indeed a fitting epitaph to his distinguished career. 




73 





A recent report, submitted by a Commission appointed 
by President Eisenhower to study the nation's health 
needs, concluded with an authoritative statement to the 
effect that there exists a serious shortage of doctors in 
virtually every branch of medical service and research, 
and that this shortage will grow more and more acute 
in coming years. The single greatest factor contributing 
to this situation, as singled out in the report, is the 
inability of the nation's medical schools to train large 
numbers of men to serve as doctors. This limited ca- 
pacity is underlined when one notes that fewer doctors 
were graduated in 1950 than in 1900, although the 
population of this country has doubled. The 1900 
doctor-patient ratio of one hundred forty-nine to one 
hundred thousand has been reduced to the 1950 ratio 
of one hundred thirty-four to one hundred thousand. 
The need for doctors is a pressing one. 



tercentenary gift 



"A CORNERSTONE of our faith is the belief 
'■ that the truest way to serve God is to serve 
man." In this spirit, the Albert Einstein College of 
Medicine was named and dedicated by Dr. Samuel 
Belkin, President of Yeshiva University, in 1950. 
And, at this ceremony, one could almost sense the 
deep meaning of that which was to take place. 

The medical center, which, in itself, is a plan to 
stir the imagination and to kindle, in the hearts of 
all people, a hope for better things, will be the first 
college of medicine to be established in New York 
City since 1898 — a modern school in a golden age 
of medical achievement, mobilizing the finest minds 
and the most comprehensive facilities for an all-out 
effort to preserve health and prevent disease. 
Indeed, it is fitting that Yeshiva University, first 
liberal arts college under Jewish auspices, be the 
pioneer in this undertaking — the establishment of 
a fully accredited, first-rate medical school affili- 
ated with a Jewish college. 

It is hard for us of the present to foresee the 
effects this school may have on both the Jewish 
and world scenes. Yet, even today, certain things 
are apparent. The Orthodox Jewish prospective 
doctor will be able to study medicine in a school 
which uses Torah as its guide. No longer must he 
choose between attending classes on Saturday and 
missing important work. 

The College promises to be among the top sci- 
ence centers in the world. Instruction will be en- 
trusted to the sure and knowing hands of the world's 
finest medical men, over four hundred of whom 
have already applied for faculty appointments. 
Having been conceived in an age of scientific ad- 



74 





T O 



AMERICA 



vancement and new ideas, the institution cannot 
but be caught up in the swift current of progress 
so characteristic of our generation. 

These three factors — a Torah atmosphere, a top 
quahty faculty, and newness— may, in part, account 
for the more than one thousand appUcations for 
admission that have already been received. 

Modern medicine requires doctors of broad edu- 
cational background and perception, men trained 
to regard patients as whole human beings, not 
merely as heart, lung, or liver cases. Students at 
the College will receive a broad, integrated view of 
medicine. Subjects will be related to each other and 
to the practical problems of patient care. Clinical 
training — bedside instruction under competent 
guidance — will begin in the student's first year. 
Students will learn about hospital bed care by serv- 
ing periodically as nurses and attendants; about 
home care, by accompanying family physicians on 
house calls. 

The Medical School in itself will be unique in 
that it will bear the imprint of a Jewish university 
devoted to the arts and sciences, and will represent 
a collective effort by our people to make its con- 
tribution to the field of medical science. The Albert 
Einstein College of Medicine will have a salutary 
effect on the many problems which confront young 
people who wish to pursue the field of medicine. 



The more opportunities we provide for men of 
science to carry on research and to teach, the more 
we will enhance the cause of medical science. 

Most of this article has touched upon benefits 
which are, in the main, physical and tangible. How- 
ever, perhaps the most important and significant 
fact demonstrated first by the establishment of 
Yeshiva University itself and now by the creation 
of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine is that 
the way of life of Orthodox Jewry, holding Torah 
and tradition sacred, is fully compatible with sec- 
ular learning, and that, given Torah as the prime 
foundation, secular learning is strengthened and 
enriched, and can flourish far beyond our fondest 
hopes. 

Yeshiva University has made a collective Jewish 
contribution to American life, a distinctive service, 
one which will earn the gratitude of all humanity. 




THAT the Jew as an individual has contributed 
his share to the founding of the American Re- 
public, is evidenced by detailed historical accounts 
of early American Jewry. However, the contribution 
of Judaism — the Jew's religion — to America's 
democratic ideals, is not commonly known. 

Instrumental in introducing Judaic principles 
and ethics into the American way of life were the 
Puritans. They lived by the Old Testament. They 
loved it and read it, not only as a basis for their 
religious beliefs, but also as a guide for their politi- 
cal and secular life. For them the ideal form of 
government was theocracy — not man, but God 
alone, could be King. In defense of their beliefs 
the Mosaic Code, as well as the teachings of Israel's 
prophets, were turned to. 

Such was the nature of the Judaic influence upon 
English civilization. From the mother country came 
the Pilgrim and Puritan immigrants to settle the 
New England colonies. 

The Old Testament in the New World: 
Like Israel of the past, the Pilgrims regarded 
themselves as "God's chosen people" and through- 
out the Revolutionary War visualized themselves 
as fighting the Philistines and the Amalekites. Their 
independence gained, the people recalled their 
forefathers' hardships and not unlike the Jews, 
recited a "Haggadah" telling of their plight. 

Jewish Law and Puritan Government: 
Most legislative documents issued by the colonies 
contained Hebraic elements. The earliest of these 
documents was the Mayflower Compact, which 
read: 

"We whose names are underwritten . . . having 
undertaken ... a voyage to plant the first colony in 
the northern part of Virginia, do by these present, 
solemnly and mutually in the presence of God, and 
one another, covenant and combine ourselves to- 
gether into a civil body politique. "'^ 
The Pilgrim Code which renounced English 
authority upon the Plymouth Colony drew as its 
source of arguments, from Nehemiah 9 and 10, 
the story of Israel's desire to dethrone foreign kings 

^Davis, John: New England's Memorial p. 36 



Judaic Influence 



and to restore the kingdom of the Lord within 
Israel. 

Again in 1639, in New Haven, the colonists 
assembled to create a civil government in accord- 
ance with the commandments of the Lord. John 
Davenport, New Haven's leader, stated that the 
Scriptures ". . . hold forth a perfect rule for the 
direction and government of all men as well as in 
the government of families and commonwealth as 
in matters of the church."- This statement was ir- 
refutable! In New Haven, the Scriptures were Law. 
At the selection of the colony's officials, verses deal- 
ing with the council of elders instituted by Moses 
were read, as recorded in Exodus and Deuteronomy. 
Criminals and prisoners were always reminded that: 
"He that hideth his sin shall not prosper, but he 
that confesseth and forsaketh his sins shall find 
mercy." (Proverbs 28: 13) Interesting to note also, 
is the fact that New Haven's adherence to the 
Mosaic Laws led them to reject trial by jury since 
no such precedent could be found in the Pentateuch. 
In 1642 and 1644, this same spirit prevailed in 
subsequent laws and legislation by the colony of 
New Haven. 

In the Massachusetts Colony, the choice of mag- 
istrates, legislation, rights of inheritance, and all 
matters of a similar nature were to be decided 
according to the rules of the Holy Scriptures. In 
1641. the "Body of Liberties" was framed. Drawn 
up by Nathaniel Ward, a Hebraist, it contained 
forty-eight laws, forty-six of which were basic stat- 
utes of the Old Testament. ( In 1 648 a new code was 
adopted based on the previous one which served 
as a covenant of the legislative body.) 

-von Dobschutz, Ernest: The Influence of Bible on Civilization 
p. 153 



76 



AMERICAN DEMOCRACY 



by HYAM WASSERMAN 




This singular text which constituted the origin 
of colonial statutes caused J. Gregory to say: "The 
Bible was their statute book, the Laws of Moses 
their foundation of authority."'' 

The Revolutionary Spirit 

The American Revolution offers the best proof 
of the spirit of liberty and democracy which was 
always identified with the Judaic influence upon 
the Revolutionists. The colonists were not satisfied 
with showing their political rights to freedom, but 
also convinced the world of the right to their inde- 
pendence from the point of view of a religious and 
moral status. Thereupon they turned to disprove 
the prevalent theory of the Divine Right of Kings 
by demonstrating it morally wrong in the eyes of 
God. For the latter, they turned to the story of 
Samuel's answer to Israel's request for a King (I. 
Samuel: 8), and Gideon's decline of the kingship 
offered him (Judges 8:22, 23), on the grounds that 
it was in conflict with the theory that God is the sole 
ruler and master of the universe. 

Thomas Paine, pamphleteer of the Revolution, 
although not an atheist, was no friend of the Tes- 
taments, either the Old or the New. Still, in his 
Common Sense, the most powerful of all his works, 
he based his final argument against monarchy on 
the Old Testament stories of Samuel and Gideon. 
He quoted them verbatim and then concluded: 
"These portions of the Scripture are direct and 
positive. . . . That the Almighty hath here entered 
his protest against monarchial government is true, 
or the Scripture is false." The mere fact that one 
so opposed to the ideas embodied in the Testaments 
adapted the Old Testament to his purpose, is deri- 

■'Gregory, J.: Puritanism in The Old World and The New 
World p. 324 



sive evidence of the Judaic influence on the masses 
of his generation. 

Known to most Americans today is the inscrip- 
tion on the Liberty Bell: "Proclaim ye liberty 
throughout the land unto all the inhabitants there- 
of." (Leviticus 25:10). Yet, what is not noted 
about this inscription is that the bell bore these 
words since 1753, almost a quarter of a century 
before the signing of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence. Such an incident reflects the influence which 
inspired the colonists' hope for freedom. 

The day of the signing of the Declaration of In- 
dependence, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson 
and John Adams were appointed to a committee 
which was to draft a seal for the United States. The 
proposed seal represented Pharaoh with a sword 
in his hand, seated in a chariot, pursuing the Israel- 
ites through the divided waters of the Red Sea. On 
the opposite shore stood the Israelites, with Moses 
at their head, his hands outstretched in the direction 
of the Sea, causing the waters to overwhelm Phar- 
aoh and his armies. Surrounding the design were the 
words: "Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God." 
The seal, although never adopted showed the pro- 
found love for Hebraic culture by the leaders who 
saw the birth of the American Republic. 

Thus we have seen that Judaism's part in the 
founding of the American Republic was far more 
considerable than what is generally known. It is no 
wonder that William Lecky employs the striking 
statement: "Hebraic mortar cemented the founda- 
tions of American democracy."* 

^Lecky, William: Rationalism in Europe, Vol. II. pp. 281-3. 



77 




ADVAXCEMEXT OF 



♦*|N a short time the American Jew will become 
■ so assimilated that he will cease to exist as a 
Jew. It is almost impossible for Judaism to survive 
here." These words were heard very frequently in 
the United States at the beginning of the 20th cen- 
tury. The feeling that prompted remarks like this 
— that the Jewish religion could not survive in 
America — became so wide-spread that the great 
rabbis and scholars of the world feared that our 
faith would be destroyed in America. Were we to 
examine the history of the Jews in America we 
would discover that there was ample cause for 
alarm. 

The first great influx of Jews to America oc- 
curred in 1654, when religious persecution com- 
pelled the Jews in Portugal to seek a new home. 
In the middle of the 19th century the German Jews 
arrived, bringing with them the concept of a reli- 
gious movement advocating less belief on the basis 
of faith and more belief on the basis of fact. The 
Haskalah combined Jewish and secular culture 
with the stress on the latter. The third wave came 
at the close of the 19th century when the Jews of 
Eastern Europe migrated to America. They, more 
than anyone else, feared the decline of their reli- 
gion. The reason is obvious. At that time the 
greatest yeshivot, the greatest Jewish minds — in 
fact, the apex and synthesis of Jewish life were all 
concentrated in Poland and Russia. When the 
immigrants of these countries observed the Jews in 
America (beards shaven. Sabbath ignored, kash- 
ruth considered too difficult to observe, and morale 



generally at a low level) they were stunned. 
Stunned, but not defeated! A decision was made: 
Judaism in America must be preserved! The reli- 
gion in whose name so many died must not be 
allowed to perish. Everything will be done to estab- 
lish the Hebrew faith in this country and no rest 
will be had until this is accomplished. And they 
proceeded to carry out this resolution. 

How well they succeeded can readily be seen. 
Concerning recent Jewish history in America no 
movement has been as striking or as vital as that 
of the Hebrew Day School, or, as we know it, the 
Yeshivah. Let us trace, for a moment, the origins 
of yeshivot in the United States. The first was 
established during the Colonial Period in New 
York. It was known as "Yeshivat Minhat Areb." 
In addition to religious studies, Spanish, English 
writing, and arithmetic were taught. By 1854 there 
were seven yeshivot in America. 

From this period on, however, there was little, 
if any, growth or development of this idea. The 
teaching of religion to our children .seemed to have 
been forgotten. The only exceptions were found in 
New York, where some independent and isolated 
schools were founded. In 1886 the Eitz Chaim 
Yeshivah was established. Since its humble begin- 
ning on New York's Lower East Side, it has devel- 
oped into the great institution of learning, Yeshiva 
University, which today encompas.ses twelve divi- 
sions instructing more than 2500 students. These 
people receive a thorough religious training while 
pursuing, at the same time, courses of study lead- 




JUDAIC STIJDIE!^ 



In A 



TttCTXCa By JACK KLEI 



N 



ing to 15 degrees. In 1902 one of New York's 
great yeshivot, Rabbi Jacob Joseph Yeshivah, was 
established. Yeshivah Tifereth Jerusalem appeared 
in 1909; Torah Vadaath, in 1918. 

During the early part of this century some head- 
way was made. By 1935 there were 17 yeshivot in 
the United States (16 in New York and one in 
Baltimore, established in 1933). 

But there were strong influences seeking to 
make the ob.servance of the Jewish faith conven- 
ient and modern by destroying and discarding the 
traditional tenets and customs which had sustained 
our people through thousands of years of glorious 
history. To combat this trend toward "streamlin- 
ing" decisive steps had to be taken. Organizations 
sprang up which were determined to stem the tide 
leading to Jewish decay. For this reason the period 
of the late 1930's to the present may well be 
termed the "era of progress of American Jewry." 

Until 1939 orthodox Jews lacked a central 
agency. When philosophies of Jewish education 
were presented, the voices of other segments of 
our community rang out clarion-clear while that of 
orthodoxy was silent. To allow such domination 
was to invite chaos. To prevent this the Mizrachi 
took the initiative and established an organization 
which was to provide leadership and force in 
opening new roads to educational heights. The 
creation of the Vaad Hachinuch Hacharedi (Miz- 
rachi National Education Committee) brought 
promise of this. 

The Vaad, with determination and vision, set 
about to halt the deterioration of religious training 
in America. Its program was praiseworthy and 
unique in that it included the study of Torah, 
individual observance, and love of Israel, the 



promised land. The Vaad Hachinuch Hacharedi 
called regional conferences in all part of the 
United States to discuss, to advise, and to develop 
yeshivah education. The success of these meetings 
can readily be shown by the fact that today there 
are more than ten yeshivot in the once seemingly 
hopeless South. In the early part of its work, the 
VHH was hampered by the lack of qualified He- 
brew teachers and administrators of all levels. The 
realization that new and better schools can be 
opened only if trained personnel are available, 
created new problems. But this condition was not 
accepted as inevitable. Lectures, in-service courses, 
seminars and workshops were conducted. Ulti- 
mately, the Institute for Hebrew Pre-School Edu- 
cation was established. It offered college-level 
courses, giving specialized training in kindergarten 
work and Hebrew Academic instruction. The 
results were so impressive that this enterprise even- 
tually became the Teachers Institute for Women of 
Yeshiva University. 

Creating Hebrew Day Schools, aiding those 
which already exist, training teachers, providing 
methods and services, representing orthodoxy in 
general — all these are activities of the Vaad 
Hachinuch Hacharedi. The Mizrachi. in creating 
the VHH acted in an emergency, and intensive 
Hebrew education has been furthered greatly. 

The year 1944 brought to the scene another 
organization which was started as an independent 
movement to found Hebrew Day Schools. Torah 
Umesorah, the National Society for Hebrew Dav 
Schools, was established by those who felt that the 
yeshivah is the most effective medium to impress 
upon the American youth the full recognition of 
his sacred heritage as a Jew. Their guiding light 
and spiritual leader was Rabbi Faivel Mendlowitz, 




79 



of blessed memory, one of the most devoted and 
selfless workers for Judaism in our generation. 

However, its leaders soon realized that the plant- 
ing of the seeds is not enough. Therefore, a great 
deal of time and attention was given to the less 
spectacular, but equally important task of servicing 
and advising these schools. Torah Umesorah's De- 
partment of Education regularly conducts surveys 
and field trips to check on pedagogical methods 
and to introduce and exchange new ideas. The 
Department of Education also conducts a seminar 
every summer, giving courses in pedagogy and 
methodology. In 1952 the Rabbinical Administra- 
tive Board of Torah Umesorah and Moriah, the 
National Federation of Hebrew Teachers and Prin- 
cipals, after tireless efforts, together formulated the 
National Yeshivah Teachers Board of License. 
This board issues licenses to teachers only after 
thorough examinations, thereby setting uniform 
standards for personnel. Needless to say, this was 
a necessity long overdue. 

Torah Umesorah conducts a placement bureau 
which, during the past year, has given more than 
100 candidates jobs as teachers and administrators. 
In the ten years of its existence Torah Umesorah 
has helped to establish 64 Hebrew Day Schools. 
In 1954, fourteen yeshivot were established in the 
United States. Of these, ten had the direct assist- 
ance of Torah Umesorah. With yeshivot in most 
of the states of the Union, our nation is dotted with 
citadels of learning where our children may drink 
from the springs of Torah. 

In the United States at the present time there 
are 157 yeshivot located in twenty-eight states. 
Eleven of these conduct Junior High Schools, 
eighteen maintain Senior High Schools, and nine 
continue into Seminary status. The important point 
is that these seminaries are situated not only in 
New York but are spread over the entire country 
— Illinois, Ohio, Maryland and elsewhere. Thus 
the yeshivah is exerting a tremendous influence 
which is growing stronger every day because of the 
continued efforts of our organizations and inde- 
pendent groups. 



It is unfortunate, however, that the majority of 
American Jewish boys and girls do not attend a 
Hebrew Day School. For this reason Talmud 
Torahs have become so wide-spread. After they 
are dismissed from Public School, children attend 
these institutions where they are taught the funda- 
mental principles of our faith: Bible, or Chumash, 
Jewish history, Sidur reading, kashruth. Sabbath, 
Bar-mitzvah. The rudiments of orthodoxy are im- 
planted in people who come from homes where 
religion is practically, if not entirely, non-existent. 
When discussing Talmud Torahs it is impossible 
not to mention the work of the Jewish Education 
Committee. This body does everything possible to 
improve the programs of Talmud Torahs. It li- 
censes teachers, prints textbooks, gives out awards, 
and prints pamphlets on Jewish topics. While 
Talmud Torahs receive the most consideration 
from the Jewish Education Committee, yeshivot 
and Public High Schools also benefit greatly from 
this organization. 

Talmud Torahs, yeshivot, synagogues, religious 
organizations — all these influences show that the 
Jews in America have not succumbed to the forces 
of assimilation. They have retained their identities 
even though it had been predicted earlier that they 
would not. In the process of being useful American 
citizens they now know that it is imperative that 
they abide by their religious code. Our ultimate 
goal is for every single Jewish child in America 
to have a religious education, practice his faith, 
and believe in the Almighty. In our country live 
many of the world's most renowned and brilliant 
Talmudic scholars, Jewish philosophers, and think- 
ers. Many made their homes here to escape the 
devastation and holocaust that was the Second 
World War. We are thankful that America has 
opened its doors to them. Their influence has been 
added incentive to continue the work of the past. 

Looking back proudly at the many constructive 
steps already taken, and optimistically at the ones 
anticipated, it can truthfully and sincerely be said 
that Judaism in America has undergone and is 
undergoing a modern renaissance. 



80 




ADVERTISEMENTS 



42. MnRTITT^ A^Al 



O r II S Y X A G O G r E s 



CONGREGATION 



B'NAI ISRAEL 



OF LINDEN HEIGHTS 



46th STREET and 9th AVENUE 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



THE JUDEA CENTER 



BROOKLYN, N. Y, 



Compliments of 



Rest Wishes to 



SHELDON WILON 



CONGREGATION 
SONS OF JUDAH 



5311 - 16th AVENUE 



BROOKLYN 4, N. Y. 



CONGREGATION 
ANSHEI OZARITZ 

885-87 Hopkinson Avenue 
Brooklyn 12, N. Y. 



CONGREGATION 
SHOMREI EMUNAH 

5202 — 14th Avenue 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 



82 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 



THE GRADUATING CLASS 
OF 1955 



from 



THE PARENTS ASSOCIATION 
of Talmudical Academy 



Mrs. Abraham Gordon, President 



83 



THE ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTIES OF 



THE YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 



OF BROOKLYN EXTEND THEIR BEST WISHES 



TO THE GRADUATES OF JUNE 1955 



84 



THE GENERAL ORGANIZATION OF 
TALMUDICAL ACADEMY, BROOKLYN BRANCH 

Congratulates 
THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1955 



OFFICERS, FALL TERM 



ELI LAZAR, President 

ELIAS HERSCHMANN, Vice-President 



OFFICERS, SPRING TERM 

ELIAS HERSCHMANN, President 
JACK KLEIN, Vice-President 



ARTHUR CANTOR, Secretary CHAIM CHARYTAN, Secretary 

MR. JOSEPH B. STRUM, Faculty Adviser 



THE ARISTA SOCIETY 
OF BROOKLYN TALMUDICAL ACADEMY 

extends to the Graduating Class its cQngratulations and 
best wishes for health, success and happiness 



OFFICERS, FALL TERM 

JERRY BLAU, Leader 

HYAM ZUCKERBERG, Vice Leader 

NORMAN BLOOM, Secretory 



OFFICERS, SPRING TERM 

HYAM ZUCKERBERG, Leader 
NORMAN BLOOM, Vice Leader 
MORRIS GOLDBERG, Secretary 



MR. SAMUEL LEBOWITZ, Faculty Adviser 



85 



Congratulations to . . . 



JEROME BLAU 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Mom, Dad, Norman and Andrea 
Grandpa Bier 

Mr. and Mrs. Israel Blau 
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Blau 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bier 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Howitz 
Mrs. Celia Goldklang 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Goldstein 



86 



n 

1 



Congratulations to . . . 



ARTHUR CANTOR 



Upon His Graduation 



Grandma Schulder 
Aunt Rose Schulder 

Edith and Murray Cantor 

Freda and Samuel Greenman 
Ricky and Leonard Singer 
Shirley and Leo Schulder 

Hermina and Seymour Reinhard 
Betty and Bert Lehmann 



Mom, Dad, and Buddy 



Michael H. Lehmann 



David, Andrew, and Israel Michael Reinhard 
Linda, David, and Susan Schulder 



87 



Congratulations to 



AVI DERSHOWITZ 



from 



Mr. and Mrs. Harry Dershowitz, 
Parents and Tully 

Grandma Ringel 

Aunt Estelle 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Ringel and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Altman 
and Gayle 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Schachter 
and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Meshenberg 



Grandpa and Grandma Dershowitz 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Dershowitz 
and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Dershowitz 
and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Fuchs and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Maultasch 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Leibowitz 

B & B Container Corp. 
Jersey City, N. J. 



Friends of 



JOSEPH HERSCHMANN 



Extend their congratulations to his son 



ELIAS HERSCHMANN 



Upon His Graduation 



Joseph Tratman 
Phil Rosenberg 



Sharlett E. Berkley 

Gallo Wine Distributors Inc. 



89 



Congratulations to 



NORMAN KUPIETSKY 

Upon His Graduation 



from 



Mother and Father 

Brothers Jonah and Moshe 
Sister Chanie 

Uncle Mendel and Aunt Dina 
Uncle Phil and Aunt Jenny 
Uncle Sam Thau 



90 



Congratulations to . . . 



NORMAN KUPIETSKY 



Upon His Graduation 



MOSHE MINTZ 



LISS AND BLECHER 



Butchers 



91 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

ELI LAZAR 

Upon His Graduation 
from 



Rabbi and Mrs. Emanuel Lazar, 
Parents 

Rabbi and Mrs. A. Klein, 
Grandparents 

Rabbi and Mrs. David Julius 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rabbi and Mrs. Solomon Goldman 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rabbi and Mrs. David B. Hollander 
Bronx, N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Greenfest 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mantel Manor 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Mr. and Mrs. Philip Silverstein 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kummer 
Wallingford, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Golub 
Wallingford, Conn. 

Mrs. Helen Lendler 
Wallingford, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Horowitz 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ronnie M. Gross 
Wilmington, Del. 

David Israel Lazar 



I 



92 




93 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 



DAVID LEVINE 

Upon His Graduation 



from 



Mr, and Mrs. Ben Martz 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Greenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Tobias Zwerdling 
Hartz Mountain Pet Foods 



94 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 



DAVID LEVINE 



Upon His Graduation 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rosensweig 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Schrag 

Uncle Aaron, Aunt Gladys, Judy, Joseph 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Eichler 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Schrelber 

Reuben H. Epstein & Co. 
32 Broadway 
New York City 



95 



Before Buying Your New Chevrolet 
Make Sure to See 

SAMMY WAGER 

at 

BEDFORD CHEVROLET 
SALES CORP. 

1410 BEDFORD AVENUE 

(Between Prospect Place and St. Mark's Avenue) 

BROOKLYN 16, N. Y. 

MAin 2-0500 MAin 2-9440 



96 



BROOKLYN'S FAMILY BANK 



Large Enough to Serve You— 



Small Enough to Know You 



KINGS COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 



FULTON STREET AT THE CORNER OF COURT SQUARE 



BROOKLYN 1, NEW YORK 



Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



97 



I. SHALOM & CO., INC 



411 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK CITY 



HANDKERCHIEFS 



98 






YOUNG MOTORS INC 



DeSOTO-PLYMOUTH DEALERS 



1689 BEDFORD AVENUE 



Opposite Ebbefs Field 



Tel. BU 4-4444 



Authorized: Sales - Parts - Service 



99 



The Graduating Class of June 1955 expresses its 
deepest sympathy to classmate 

PHILIP HALBFINGER 

on the passing of his beloved father, Chaim 



100 



In Memory of 



RABBI and MRS. ISRAEL KLEIN 



Great-grandparents of Eli Lazar 



Klein Family Foundation 



In Memory of 

YETTA WEINGARTEN 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Bienenstock 

Mr. and Mrs. Israel M. Weingarten 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Grossman 

Mr. and Mrs. Abe Bruch 

Mr. and Mrs. William Bruch 



101 



Congratulations to . . . 



ALEXANDER BIENENSTOCK 

Upon His Graduation 



Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Bienenstock 



Mr. and Mrs. Israel M. Weingarten 



Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Grossman 



Mr. and Mrs. Abe Bruch 



Mr. and Mrs. William Bruch 



\i 



Congratulations to 



NORMAN BLOOM 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Bloom 

Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Wallach 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rosen 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Katz 

Mr. and Mrs. Morty Weschner 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Horowitz 
Baby Mitchell Jay Bloom 



102 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

HERMAN BURSKY 

Upon His Graduation 
from 

Mom and Dad 
Grandma 

Aunt Tillie and Uncle Joe 

Aunt Dotty and Uncle Joey 

Aunt Ruth and Uncle Jack 
Philip and Myron 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

HERMAN BURSKY 

Upon His Graduation 



Mr. and Mrs. David Goldberg 

^r. and Mrs. Sam Seelenfreund 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis L. Berman 



Mr. and Mrs. Harold Leyine 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Becker 



103 



Congratulations to . . . 

ARTHUR EIDELMAN 

Upon His Graduation 
from 

Mom and Dad 

Grandma and Grandpa 
Barbara and Aaron 

Uncle Mike and Aunt Sara 

Uncle Milton and Aunt Ruth 

Aunt Bea, Aunt Ceil, Aunt Edith, Aunt Lillian 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 



ELIAS HERSCHMANN 



Upon His Graduation 



A Friend of Joseph Herschmann 



104 



LINCOLN WINES & LIQUORS 



407 TOMPKINS AVENUE 



BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 



Tel. GL 5-2000 



Extends Its Congratulations to 

ELIAS HERSCHMANN 

Upon His Graduation 



Best Wishes to 



NORMAN KUPIETSKY 

Upon His Graduation 

S. Schaffer Grocery Corp. 

Star Towel and Napkin Supply Co. 
Lowen's Bake Shop 

I. Goldberg & Son 

Metro Kosher Ices 

Kingston Fruiterers 



105 



Best Wishes to . . . 

SHELDON WILON 

Upon His Graduation 



JUST RITE NOVELTY INC 

15 WAVERLY PLACE 
NEW YORK CITY 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

SHELDON WILON 

from 

PLASTIC SPANGLES INC 

15 WAVERLY PLACE 
NEW YORK CITY 



106 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 

NORMAN GORLYN 

Upon His Graduation 

THE MEARL CORP. 

153 WAVERLY PLACE 
NEW YORK 14, N. Y. 




107 



Best Wishes to . . . 

BERTON LAPIDUS 

Upon His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. Abraham A. Hiltzik 
Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Lopidus 


Compliments and Best Wishes to . . . 

ROBERT D. NEWMAN 


Congratulations to . . . 

BERTON 

Upon His Graduation 
Mom, Dad and Ira 


Congrofu/otions to . . . 

JOSEPH PENNER 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex Shvetz 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rechter 



108 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 


Congr.atulations to our Nephew 


MOSHE 


BARNEY 


Upon His Graduation 


Upon His Graduation 


Mom, Dad and Joe 


Mr. and Mrs. A. Ellman and Family 


Congratu/of/ons ond Best Wishes 





To Our Son 



Congratu/afions fo 



MOSHE 



NORMAN ZABROWSKY 



Upon His Graduation 



Mr. and Mrs. Barney Zabrowsky 



Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Reiss 



109 



Congratulations to . . . 


Best Wishes to . . . 


JOSEPH 


PHIL HALBFINGER 


Upon His Graduation 


from 


from 


S. M. COPLON 


Mr. and Mrs. Martin Geffen 


200 Fifth Avenue 


Miltie and Moishe 


Nev/ York, N. Y. 


Congratulations to . . . 


Congratu/ations to . . . 


HAROLD 


PHIL HALBFINGER 

from 


Mr. and Mrs. Abe Clatter 


Paul Lazarus of 


and Family 


PEERLESS TREE LITE 


1735 Bath Avenue 


749 Atlantic Avenue 


Brooklyn 14, N. Y. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Congratulations to . . . 


Mazel Toy to . . . 


JACOB 


PHIL HALBFINGER 


Greenfield Brothers 


from 


of Boro Park 


HARRY FENSTERHEIM 


Best Wishes to . . . 




TSVI GRONER 


Congratulations to . . . 


Poultry Shoctim Union Local 370 


ELIAS HERSCHMANN 


Rev. E. Meltzer, President 




Rev. E. Goodman, Vice-President 


Upon His Graduation 


Rev. M. Leiter, Secrefory 


Bertha and Avram Horowitz 


G. Lederman, Manoger 





110 



Congratulations to my Uncle 






Good Luck to . . . 


ELIAS HERSCHMANN 




Upon His Graduation 


BOB 


ELLEN JUDY SHORE 




(1 4 months old) 


Mom, Dad and Freddy 


Congratulations to . . . 


Best Wishes to . . . 


MARVIN HIRSCHHORN 


a good young friend 




JACK KLEIN 


MITCHELL'S 


Standard Tape & Trimming Co. 


171 First Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 


61 1 Broadway 
New York 12, N. Y. 




Congroti/lot/ons to . . . 


Congrotu/ot/ons to . . . 


JACK KLEIN 


MARVIN HIRSCHHORN 


Upon His Graduation 


Upon His Graduation 


Mr. and Mrs. S. Wiederspiel 


The Family 


645 West End Avenue 




New York, N. Y. 


Congratulations to . . . 


Good luck to . . . 

JACK KLEIN 


BOB 


Upon His Graduation 




Adolf Schrager Furniture Inc. 


D. BARABAN 


A^odern Home Fashions 


282 Whitehall Street 


1647 Second Avenue 


Lynbrook, N. Y. 


New York, N. Y. 
REgent 7-2850 



111 



Besf Wishes fo . . . 


Congrotu/ot/ons to our President 


JOSEPH PENNER 


HYAM L. ZUCKERBERG 


Upon His Graduation 


Upon His Graduation 


from 


Good Health and Good Luck 


Mr. and Mrs. Roman Shvetz 


Mizrachi Hatzair of Forest Hills 


Congrofo/ations to . . . 


To my son 

HYAM L. ZUCKERBERG 


ALBERT 


Upon His Graduation 


Upon His Graduation 


Every wisti for Good Health and 
Good Fortune 


from 


Roberta L. Zuckerberg 


His Aunt 




Con grotu/of ions to . . . 


% 




MARTIN SCHIFFENBAUER 


Compliments of D/VKl vIN J fc»ftL«I«c 




FAMOUS FOR CONTINENTAL 




CHOCOLATES 


Congrotu/at/ons to . . . 

MARTIN SCHIFFENBAUER 


Compliments of . . . 


Upon His Graduation 


MR. and MRS. 


ROMAN FURNITURE CORP. 


JONAS P. BERNSTEIN 


56-66 Meserole Street, Near Lorimer Street 


1245 Eastern Parkway 


Brooklyn 6, N. Y. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 



112 



BESTFORM FOUNDATIONS, Inc. 


Our Sincerest Thanks to . . . 

MR. and MRS. ISIDORE FEIT 


38-01 47th AVENUE 


Sandy and Harriet 




Bebe and Helen 


LONG ISLAND CITY 1, N. Y. 


for their generous hospitality on so many 
occasions, especially throughout this year. 


^^^^!»? 


Roberta L. Zuckerberg and Hyam 




ESplanade 7-6454 


Compliments of . . . 


GAYE-SILVERS ORCHESTRA 




The Finest in Music and Entertainment 


ABRAHAM BUCHBAUM 


4155 KINGS HIGHV/AY 




BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


Compliments of . . . 




COHEN & POSNER 


H. HARMON CO. 


Prime Meats 


23 EAST 54th STREET 


2187 WALTON AVENUE 


NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 


BRONX, N. Y. 




in Memory of . . . 


Compl/ments of . . . 


LOUIS FEINGUT 






HYMAN L. HELLER 


Mrs. P. Feingut 





113 



For a lovely treat 
Take your friends to 

HERSHI'S KNISHOP, Inc. 

Air Conditioned Closed Saturday 
4903 TWELFTH AVENUE 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. . 


NATHAN JOSEPH 

110 FULTON STREET 
NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 


INDUSTRIAL TEXTILE 
PROCESSING CO. 

752 64th STREET 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


Comp/Zments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. ABE KATZ 
and SONS 

1260-47th STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


Compliments of . . . 

JACK'S HYGRADE MEAT MARKET 

50 17- 13th AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

GEdney 6-1823 


KENIG ELECTRONIC & WIRE CORP. 

55 EAST 42nd STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 


BUckminster 4-5303 

AL JOHNSON GLASS COMPANY 

Auto Glass — Locks — Keys 
Hydraulic Electric Window Repairs 

] 675-77 BEDFORD AVENUE 
BROOKLYN 25, N. Y. 
Opposite Ebbets Field 


MAPLE LAKE CAMP 

LIVINGSTON MANOR, N. Y. 



114 



MARLBORO KOSHER 

CHAMPAGNE - WINE - VERMOUTH 

Under the Orthodox Rabbinical 

Supervision of Rabbi David Shisgal 

AAARLBORO, NEW YORK 




PILDES CO. 

Opticians 

80 NASSAU STREET 
NEW YORK 38, N. Y. 

BA 7-9894 



NUMARK KNiniNG MILLS 



Comp/imenfi of 



347 LORIMER STREET 



MR. and MRS. LEO RING 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



CHickering 4-3450 



OIL CITY PETROLEUM CO., INC. 



1776 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



WILLIAM ROSENFELD 

Manufacfuring Furrier 
251 WEST 30th STREET 

PE 6-8276 



115 



MAin 4-8250 


Comp/Zments of . . . 


SAM B. SAPIRSTEIN 

66 COURT STREET 


THE T. A. MINYAN 


BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


Corner Rogers Avenue and President Street 


Genera/ Agenf: 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Continental Life Insurance Company 






UNITED PEARL CORP. 


Comp//nienf$ of . . . 


26 WEST 47th STREET 




NEW YORK, N. Y. 


JACK SIEGFRIED 


Importers of Cultured Pearls 




Wholesale and Retail 


WILLIAM SOLOMON & CO., INC. 


H. WAXLER & CO. 


Insurance 




70 PINE STREET 


441 1-1 6th AVENUE 


NEW YORK 5, N. Y. 


BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


WHitehall 3-0340 




SAMUEL L. STREEP CO. 




Typography 


Compliments of . . . 


Monotype . . . and Hand Composition 




200 HUDSON STREET 


HARRY WOHL 


NEW YORK CITY 




WAlker 5-5540-1 





116 



Congratulations to . . . 


Bojf Wishes to . . . 


JOSEPH GEFFEN 


JACK KLEIN 


from 


Upon His Graduation 


Mr. and Mrs. E. Weinman and Robert 


Mr. and Mrs. A. Rubin 


Congratulations to . . . 

TSVI GRONER 


A Friend of 


Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Feller and Family 


NORMAN KUPIETSKY 


Good luck to . . . 

PHIL HALBFINGER 


Congratulations to . . . 


from 


DAVID LEVINE 


JOSEPH B. ZAHN 


A Friend 


30 WEST 24th STREET NEW YORK 10, N. Y. 




Congratulations to . . . 

PHIL HALBFINGER 

from 


Congrofu/af/oni fo our ion and brother 

JERRY LLOYD 


Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Goldberg 


Upon His Graduation 


and Daughters 


Mr. and Mrs. Al Lloyd and Morty 


Congratulations to . . , 


Good luck to . . . 


MARVIN HIRSCHHORN 


JERRY 


Upon His Graduation 


from 


C. ZUNNO 


MEHR & KAPLAN BUTCHER SHOP 


Good Luck fo . . . 


Congratulations to . . . 


BOB HIRT 


JOSEPH 


JACOB CHERNACK 

1052 RUTLAND ROAD BROOKLYN 12, N. Y. 


On His Graduation 

R. PLISNER 

Stationery Wholesaler 


Good Luck fo . . . 




BOB HIRT 


Best Wishes fo . . . 


from 

STERN'S BAKERY 


JOE PENNER 


1062 RUTLAND ROAD BROOKLYN 12, N. Y. 




To JACK KLEIN 




May you always have the best of luck 


A Friend of 


in all your future undertakings. 

Father, Mother and Renee 


MOSHE REISS 



117 



Congratulations to . . . 


Congrafu/al/ons fo our son 


MARTIN SCHIFFENBAUER 


MALCOLM 


Upon His Graduation 


Upon His Graduation 


A Friend 


Mr. and Mrs. Murray Wolfe 


Congratulations to . . . 


With Best Wishes fo my grandson 


BERNARD SEGAL 


MALCOLM WOLFE 


Upon His Graduation 


Upon His Graduation 


A Friend 


Mrs. Naomi Becker 


Congratulations to our son 




STANLEY 


Congratulations fo . . . 


Upon His Graduation 


NORMAN ZABROWSKY 


Mr. and Mrs. M. Siegelman 




Congratulations fo . . . 


Best Wishes and Congratulations to . . . 


STANLEY 

from 


HYAM ZUCKERBERG 


A Friend 


Beatrice Feit 


Congrafufafions to . . . 


Congratulations to . . . 


LEONARD TRUGMAN 


HYAM ZUCKERBERG 




Upon His Graduation 


Riemer Family 


Mr. and Mrs. 1. Feit and Children 


Best Wishes fo . . . 




LEONARD TRUGMAN 


DR. and MRS. B. GINSBERG 


from 


extend their best wishes io 


A Friend 


THE GRADUATES 


Good luck to : . . 


Congrofu/af/onj fo . . . 


JOE 


The Graduating Class 


from 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Tuch 


STAN ROSENFELD 


Best of Luck fo our jon 

ALLEN 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Weiss 


IN MEMORY OF MY BELOVED DAUGHTER 

JULIA 


and brother, Manny 


Mrs. Naomi Becker 



118 



CompUm»nfs of . . . 

ALLAHAND'S RELIABLE DRUG STORE 



2084-86 STREET 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

H. BODEK & BROS. 



BArcloy 7-8918-9 

ATLANTIC CLOTHING CO., INC. 

Manufocturers of "Allen Park" - "Baychester" 
Morris Jaffe 1 ALIEN STREET 



LOUIS BOGOPULSKY 



459 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 13, N. Y. 



B. & B. FOOD SHOP 



270 KINGSTON AVENUE 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Ulster 4-7500 

BORO FUEL OIL CO. 

"Finest in Fuel Oil" 

Wm. Cohn 

2 CHURCH AVENUE BROOKLYN 18, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. ISAAC BAKAL 
and son JOSEPH 

2314 STRAUSS STREET BROOKLYN 12, N. Y. 



tE^tjt Commentator 

Official Undergraduate Newspaper of 

YESHIVA COLLEGE 



PFC JULES BECK 



26th Infantry Regiment 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. HARRY ENKER and SONS 



Compliments of . . . 

BECKER'S CLOTHES 

Closed Saturdays 

Open Saturday Evening ond Sunday 

421 3-1 3th AVENUE BROOKLYN 19, N. Y. 



GEdney 6-4749 - 0332 

BEDDING MANUFACTURER'S OUTLET 



MATTRESSES - QUILTS - PILLOWS 



EUGENE'S Continental Pastry Shop 

3043 AVENUE V — Corner Coyie Sli 



Compliments of . . . 

DR. J. FAGELMAN 



4306-8-1 2lh AVENUE 



BROOKLYN 19, N. Y. 



BLOOM'S HIGH QUALITY CANDY 

3037 FULTON STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



ComplimentJ of . . . 

RABBI and MRS. LEWIS GOLDBERG 



119 



MR. and MRS. NATHAN GROSSBARD 

72 EAST 7th STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 


LACECRAFT NOVELTY CO. 

1261 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 


GROSSMAN & FEDER 

Certified Public Accountants 
217 BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Complimcnfs of . . . 

DR. GEORGE LANDSMAN 


-A Friend of the Yeshiva 

MR. and MRS. MAX GORDON 


SLocum 6-5363 

Diamonds - Watches - Jewelry 
Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

LATZMAN & SONS 

240 UTICA AVENUE BROOKLYN 13, N. Y. 


S. GREENWALD & SONS 

Real Estate and Insurance 
186 BROADWAY BROOKLYN 11, N. Y. 


GEdney 6-3455 

MR. and MRS. BEN LEFKOWITZ 

Kosher Meats and Poultry 
5005-1 6lh AVENUE BROOKLYN 4, N. Y. 


Tel. EV 5-9629 

GUTNICK & MINES 

Bufchen 
365 EAST 98lh STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


Dickens 2-0347 

HARRY LEVY 

Shoes for the Entire Family 
408 SARATOGA AVENUE BROOKLYN 33, N. Y. 


Compliments of . . . 

HARRY'S FISH STORE 

Harry Schneider, Prop. 

3130 MERMAID AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

ES 2-6429 


Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. HYMAN LIFSCHITZ 


ITZKOWITZ & BRAWER 

4423-1 4th AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


GEdney 5-9500 

J. L. LIPSCHITZ 

All Watch Repairs Tested b/ 

WESTERN ELECTRIC WATCH MAKER 

1280-49 STREET BROOKLYN 19, N. Y. 


GE 5-5333 

JACK'S QUALITY FRUITS & VEGETABLES 

1306-08-50th STREET 
Closed Saturdays and Jewish Holidays 


ULster 6-7200 

MAISON CHARLES 

French Cleaners 
567 FLATBUSH AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



120 



Comp/imenfj of . . . 

DR. ABRAHAM MANDELBAUM 



NOBLE DRUGS 



411 KINGSTON AVENUE 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 




GEdney 8-7438 

ONEG POULTRY CO. 

Strictly Kosher Catering 
4911-12lh AVENUE BROOKLYN 19, N. Y. 



EV 7-2809 

MARCY BINDERY 

Commercial Printing 
170 MARCY AVENUE BROOKLYN 1 1 , N. Y. 




HYacinth 8-7510 

MARTIN SERVICE 

Custom Cleaning — Fine Tailoring 
769 NEW LOTS AVENUE BROOKLYN 6, N. Y 



ORIENTAL CLEANERS 

390 KINGSTON AVENUE 



HYacinth 7-3690 

CENTRAL PACKING CORP. 

City Dressed Beef 
352 JOHNSON AVENUE BROOKLYN 6, N. Y. 



CAnal 6-7707-8-9 

ABRAHAM PHILIPS & SONS, INC. 



of TOP TOV/N CLOTHES 

NEW YORK 2, N. Y. 




44 EAST BROADWAY 



POULTRY SHOCHTIM UNION 

Rev. E. Meltzer, Pres. 

Rev. M. Goodman, Vice-Pres. 

Rev. M. Leiter, Secy. 

G. ledermon, Mgr. 



MITTMAN'S MEAT & POULTRY 

253 ROGERS AVENUE 
BROOKLYN 25, N. Y. 




REGENCY CLEANERS 



381 KINGSTON AVENUE BROOKLYN 13, N. Y. 



HYacinth 3-9885 

RENARD PHOTOGRAPHERS 

289 UTICA AVENUE 
BROOKLYN 13, N. Y. 



121 



HYacinlh 7-1166-7-8-9-70 




THE J. H. RODMAN-GRAFF CORP. 


Compliments of . . . 


Slaughterers of Calves and Lambs 


MR. and MRS. SHWARTZ 


309-317 JOHNSON AVENUE, BROOKLYN 6, N. Y. 




To Our Nephew . . . 


SLocum 6-3365 


DAVID ROSENMAN 


S. & H. SILVERSTEIN 




MEAT and POULTRY AAARKET 


Mr. and Mrs. Jack Wertheim 


Kosher Meafs 
883 NOSTRAND AVENUE BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


SAM'S BARGAIN STORE 


Compiiments of . . . 


1400 ST. JOHN'S PLACE 


MR. and MRS. JACK SIROTA 


CLoverdale 7-9777, 9866 




SCHARF'S PHARMACY 


Compliments of . . . 


HEGEMAN CORNER MONTAUK AVENUES 


MR. and MRS. LOUIS SOBEL 


BROOKLYN, N. Y. 






PResident 3-0086 


Compliments of . . . 


SAM STEGINSKY 


MR. and MRS. MORRIS M. SCHEINBERG 


Strictly Kosher MEAT ond POULTRY MARKET 


1433-49lh STREET, BROOKLYN 


954 NOSTRAND AVENUE 




Wisconsin 7-6785 


SCHICK'S BAKE SHOP 


MORRIS H. STERNLIGHT 




Certified Public Accountant 




113 WEST 42nd STREET NEW YORK 18, N. Y. 


SEMEL & SON 


STUHMER'S 




Egg Enriched Loaf 


SELF SERVICE FOOD CENTER 


More Egg — Protein — Taste 


S013-13lh AVENUE BROOKLYN 19, N. Y. 


by the bakers of Stuhmer's Pumpernickel 


HYacinth 5-0840 




ISIDORE SHIMANSKY 


Compliments of . . . 


Saturday Observed BAKERY 


MR. and MRS. 1. TAGER & FAMILY 


502 EAST 92nd STREET BROOKLYN 12, N. Y. 





122 



WEISSMAN PAPER BOX CO., INC. 




852 MONROE STREET 




BROOKLYN, N. Y. 




Compliments of . . . 


YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 


MR. and MRS. DAVID YARMUSH 




2352 BATCHELDER STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


Women's Organization 


:Anal 6-8252 


Congrafu/afes 


WALTER YOKEL COMPANY 




Cotfon Goods 
10 GREENE STREET NEW YORK 13, N. Y. 


THE GRADUATES 


YOUNG ISRAEL OF BORO PARK 




1363-50th STREET 




BROOKLYN, N. Y. 




ALgonquin 5-4611-4994 






Compliwenfs to . . . 


CASSELL 
TRUCKING CORPORATION 


WARREN ENKER 


Bonded— Insured— Babcock Equipped 


from 


162 WEST 27th STREET 




NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 


Mr. and Mrs. Horry Silver 


Custom House License No. 1363 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry Enker 


Appraisers Store Box No. 281 





123 



SOL CAFE MFG. CORP. 



180-05 BRINKERHOFF AVENUE 



JAMAICA 33, N. Y. 





Compliments of . . . 




Warren Enker Seymour Golshevsky 


Compliments of . . . 


Maurice Strohlberg Irwin Henschel 
Nechemiah Reiss 


DAVY CROCKEH 








"King of fhe Wild Frontier" 


Compliments of . . . 




THE G.O. CANDIDATES 




Lester Kerschenbaum Jerroid Neugeboren 




Chaim Charytan Danny Frimmer 


Compliments of . . . 


Best Wishes to . . . 


DR. and MRS. M. LEVINE 


MALCOLM WOLFE 


175 DIVISION AVENUE 




BROOKLYN 11, N. Y. 


Mr. and Mrs. Nehemiah Piller 




Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rosenstein and Son 


Congratulations to . . . 


Samuel C. Manderson, General Insurance 


THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1955 


Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Alidort 


George Klein — Pincus Rosenfeld 


Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Ney 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Ben Laeger, Equitable Life Assurance Soc. 



124 



Compliments of 



ALABAMA KOSHER-DRESSED 

POULTRY CO. 
SAM ASH 
SOL BASS 

BERNIE'S FRUIT STORE 
MR. and MRS. I. BLUSH 
A FRIEND OF HERMAN BURSKY 
PHIL BURSKY 
CHARLES' FRUIT AND 

VEGETABLE MARKET 
CHATHAM CLOTHES 
DE-LUXE BEAUTY SHOPPE 
MR. FELDMAN 
FRANK'S SHOE STORE 
FRIEDMAN'S DELICATESSEN 
GOLD'S SHOE STORE 
GOLDSTEIN'S CANDY STORE 
GROSS LUNCHEONETTE 
ELLIOT GROSSBARD 
HAUFT GROCERY 
MR. and MRS. JACK HECKER 
HY AND JOE FRUIT MARKET 
HEYMAN'S PHARMACY 
JACK'S SWEET SHOP 
GOLDIE JUTKOWITZ 



SAUL KAMINSKY 



KAPLAN'S APPETIZING STORE 

KENSINGTON FURNITURE SHOP 

N. KERNER FURS 

MR. ALEX KLEIN 

BEN LEFKOWITZ, MEAT and POULTRY 

MR. and MRS. H. KREIDER 

TO JACK KLEIN FROM L CHASKIN 

LEVINE BROTHERS, BUTCHERS 

MR. and MRS. J. LEVINE 

MR. and MRS. SAM LEVINE 

LILLIANTHAL'S GROCERY 

LUI'S HAND LAUNDRY 

MR. LOUIS MENDELES 

I. ORENBUCH and FAMILY 

ISIDORE PESKOWITZ 

LARRY PRESS 

ROMAN'S 

SCHARF BROTHERS 

MR. and MRS. H. SCHNISSEL 

MR. and MRS. PINCUS SCHOEN 

A. SILVERBERG CLEANERS 

SILVER'S FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

MATILDA and LOUIS SOLOMON 

STERN BROTHERS, BUTCHERS 

STERN and ELBOGEN, KOSHER BUTCHERS 

MR. and MRS. H. WERTHEIMER 



ZWAIL'S FISH STORE 



125 



S^fl/€^^/^€^^ 



126 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 

DAVID ABERBACH, 1443 - 50 Street GE 6-5967 

ALLAN BACHMAN, 1429-47 Street GE 6-4880 

ALEX BIENENSTOCK, 1379-54 Street UL 1-7803 

JEROME BLAU, 5315-15 Avenue UL 1-6580 

NORMAN BLOOM, 8806 Bay Parkway ES 3-1664 

HERMAN BURSKY. 1446-52 Street ' UL 1-7606 

ARTHUR CANTOR, 2121 Beekman Place IN 2-3189 

FRANKLYN DANZIGER, 287 Hart Street GL 5-5867 

ALLAN DERSHOWITZ, 1558-48 Street GE 5-3820 

ARTHUR EIDELMAN, 1361 -46 Street GE 6-4076 

YEHUDI FELMAN, 294 Parkside Avenue IN 2-8027 

JOSEPHGEFFEN, 641 Montgomery Street HY 3-2810 

HAROLD GLATTER, 577 East 5 Street HY 5-5766 

LEONARD GOLDSMITH, 659 Georgia Avenue CL 7-2081 

SIDNEY GOLDSTEIN, 1159 Eastern Parkway PR 3-1252 

NORMAN GORLYN, 170 South 9 Street EV 8-4758 

JACOB GREENFIELD, 1335-47 Street GE 6-4833 

IRWIN GREENSPAN, 365 New York Avenue SL 6-6817 

TSVI GRONER, 5123- 11 Avenue UL 3-7213 

PHILIP HALBFINGER, 1402 Sterling Place , . SL 6-6156 

ELIAS HERSCHMANN, 299 Montgomery Street SL 6-2222 

MARVIN HIRSCHHORN, 1269-50 Street GE 5-5221 

ROBERT HIRT, 183 East 96 Street DI 2-3695 

JACK KLEIN, 8714-21 Avenue ES 2-8498 

NORMAN KUPIETSKY, 275 Kingston Avenue SL 6-4522 

BERTONLAPIDUS, 1149 Putnam Avenue HY 1-1923 

ELI LAZAR, 683 Essex Street CL 7-1465 

DAVID LEVINE, 1164 East 22 Street CL 8-2166 

MARTIN LISTOWSKY, 1179 President Street . . . 

JERRY LLOYD, 420 Avenue F UL 3-1840 

ROBERT NEWMAN, 227 Utica Avenue SL 6-2530 

JACOB NUSBACHER, 145 Hooper Street EV 8-4631 

JOSEPH PENNER, 5601 - 14 Avenue UL 1-8742 

GERALD PINSKY, 2511 Ocean Avenue SH 3-0638 

MOSES POLANSKY, 1198 Eastern Parkway PR 2-2845 

ALBERT REINGOLD, 1310-48 Street UL 3-9115 

MOSHE REISS, 637 Montgomery Street PR 2-7177 

MARTIN SCHIFFENBAUER, 384 Kingston Avenue PR 3-6838 

BERNARD SEGAL, 183 Wilson Street EV 8-2354 

STANLEY SIEGELMAN, 99 Taylor Street EV 4-6748 

LEONARD TRUGMAN, 205 South 3 Street ST 2-5278 

JOSEPH TUCH, 7520-20 Avenue BE 2-9474 

ALLEN WEISS, 1020-44 Street UL 4-0207 

IRVING WELFELD, 49 Lee Avenue EV 4-0220 

SHELDON WILON, 1436-51 Street UL 1-7387 

MALCOLM WOLFE, 459 East 92 Street EV 5-3095 

BARNEY YUKOLIS, 660 Hegeman Avenue CL 7-0311 

NORMAN ZABROWSKY, 1017 Hegeman Avenue NI 9-3151 

HYAM ZUCKERBERG, 102-35 - 67 Road, Forest Hills TW 6-4882 



127 




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